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Pushup_Man
May 31, 2007, 04:09 PM
My mates and i are starting our own fight club. we will be fighting all out with gloves and mouthguards. so obviously the training i have to do is the same training for boxers, street fighters etc.

so here is my training routine
decline pushups(varying also with diamond decline pushups)
dips
pullups
situps.

i warm up with shadow boxing. i will jog twice a week and rope jumping three times a week.

is there anything else i should add? would doing one arm pushups be beneficial?i can do 5 on each arm.
thanks

Pushup_Man
May 31, 2007, 05:22 PM
also does size matter in a fight? does the bigger, heavier and stronger guy always win against a smaller opponent? because i weigh 93 kilos and i am 6ft 2 so i am big and strong(i can do 5 one arm pushups on each arm). but i have to admit that my punches are slow.

Djr3322
May 31, 2007, 07:14 PM
Your not supposed to talk about fight club

Pushup_Man
May 31, 2007, 07:37 PM
lol yeah well mine is a special type of fight club. hehe i wonder if im gonna be getting answers to my questions soon...it would be nice if i did. :P

crazydan
May 31, 2007, 07:42 PM
yah bro definetly try and get big and strong it helps but also try and gt fast explosive and strong. you need more lower body and core work. and so some HIIT

Pushup_Man
May 31, 2007, 07:48 PM
should i concentrate more on strength and power than on muscular endurance?like should i do one arm pushups instead of regular pushups?

Sepanto
Jun 01, 2007, 04:11 AM
also does size matter in a fight? does the bigger, heavier and stronger guy always win against a smaller opponent? because i weigh 93 kilos and i am 6ft 2 so i am big and strong(i can do 5 one arm pushups on each arm). but i have to admit that my punches are slow.Not neccesarily, at 109 KG's a 60 Kg's Kung FU grandmaster actually defeated me... but between people of similiar skill size does matter.

evilman
Jun 03, 2007, 06:11 PM
My mates and i are starting our own fight club. we will be fighting all out with gloves and mouthguards. so obviously the training i have to do is the same training for boxers, street fighters etc.

so here is my training routine
decline pushups(varying also with diamond decline pushups)
dips
pullups
situps.

i warm up with shadow boxing. i will jog twice a week and rope jumping three times a week.

is there anything else i should add? would doing one arm pushups be beneficial?i can do 5 on each arm.
thanks

LOL.. with your fightclub what you need is being able to take a punch.
And yea.. go for muscle endurance/cardio and speed.

Pushup_Man
Jun 04, 2007, 03:27 AM
i can take a punch. i have been punched before and had no problem.

Big Jew
Jun 07, 2007, 09:23 PM
Work that cardio so you only need breathe thru your nose.
A punch to an open jaw = 1 KO

bas410
Jun 10, 2007, 04:55 PM
endurance, explosive strength and most important a cool head is what you need for fighting.

Stormy
Jun 11, 2007, 09:27 AM
Are you fighting in rounds? If so high intensity interval running/cardio work would be good over the length of time of your rounds. EG, if your fights are five two minute rounds with one minute rest between rounds, work up to being able to work at full intensity for three minute rounds with 30 seconds rest between rounds. Also skipping for footwork and spar, a lot. As for strength work, what you're doing is good, but I'd add in medicine ball work and plyometrics. you got to take a hit!

bretakmf
Jul 13, 2007, 01:31 PM
also does size matter in a fight? does the bigger, heavier and stronger guy always win against a smaller opponent? because i weigh 93 kilos and i am 6ft 2 so i am big and strong(i can do 5 one arm pushups on each arm). but i have to admit that my punches are slow.

it's important to learn how to fight based on your body type--maximize your natural strengths. some big guys won't have lightning hands--this doesn't mean that you shouldn't train in striking, but if you're big and strong then use strikes to close the distance and then get close enough to grab and control, for example.

train everything, but come to understand how you can best fight, using your unique qualities. some people are best suited to striking, some people can punch well but have slow legs, some can grapple well but can't slug it out, etc etc...

moriarty
Jul 15, 2007, 07:09 AM
I don't know much about fighting, but I'd say drop the sit-ups and do more plyometric leg work: Plyo lunges, burpees, tuck-jumps and single leg jumps to name a few. Be sure to do it in as intense a fashion as possible. You might like to check out Ross Enamait's site for this.

Jackal
Jul 15, 2007, 12:19 PM
Try and build a warrior mindset, yes you may beable to take a punch but would taking many punches in a single fight knock your confidence? Are you willing to train all the time, do you have the dedication? You need to build courage, technique, concentration and always keep in touch with instinct.

bretakmf
Jul 15, 2007, 01:21 PM
I don't know much about fighting, but I'd say drop the sit-ups and do more plyometric leg work: Plyo lunges, burpees, tuck-jumps and single leg jumps to name a few. Be sure to do it in as intense a fashion as possible. You might like to check out Ross Enamait's site for this.

nope, keep the situps--you need lots of core/ab work...got to be prepared for getting punched and/or kicked in the stomach or ribs.

hitting on a heavy bag is one of the best things that you can do for overall conditioning for fighting--this will build up your core, too, especially the muscles that protect your ribs--the intercostals--because of the rotation needed to throw punches--the power comes from hip and waist rotation.

plyos are good because of the speed involved--learn to explode. remember to train to punch not push...F = MA, the force that you can generate results from the mass of your fist accelerating to the greatest degree possible. the greater the speed over the distance of the range between your stance and the opponent's face, the greater the impact. pushing a punch is slow.

neck work is important, too--the stronger the neck the more impact you can absorb. same principle applies to the erector muscles, too. if you ever been hit a good amount of times you'll know that these muscle groups are usually sore the next day.

ross's site is great: www.rosstraining.com--there's a link there to his boxing site, too.

moriarty
Jul 17, 2007, 08:21 AM
Yeah, my bad- keep the core work.

Just that sit-ups are generally considered inferior for building a strong core compared to other exercises. Then again, the only ab work I do is push-ups with my hands far forward.

Mind you, don't get too strong. Most of my friends would stop hanging out with me if I beat the shit out of them.

crazydan
Jul 18, 2007, 04:06 PM
i would recomend that you have a freind drop a medicine ball on your stomach harder each time so you can build up for taking a punch

Singnakornchai
Aug 07, 2007, 06:11 PM
You need to ensure your cardio is up there and most important you need to get a good grounding "go and learn the basics of boxing from a good coach" anyone can hit a bag hard. You need to sort out your footwork and simply just work on the basics "no fancy stuff you seen pretty boy floyd doing, he's been doing that for 25 years". Don't be bouncing around like a nutter "maybe try and emulate a boxer you like, tight hands covering your chin, elbows protecting your ribs, head movement" you can find plenty of drills on the net of the basics "it will make a whole world of diference to your game". Look up crazy monkey defence "serious" south african guy teaches it, very effective for part time fighters. Anyway good luck, keep us posted on how you get on and remember make sure it's as safe as it can be :)

theleadbreeder
Aug 07, 2007, 07:26 PM
I'd also add bagwork. Get used to actually hitting something with your strikes instead of just shadowboxing. Do alot of core work as all your power from your strikes and kicks are generated from there. Alot of people neglect abs and lower back but it is ultra important.

David43515
Aug 08, 2007, 08:37 AM
Work your traps and neck to reduce the chances of getting KOed when you head snaps back from a punch.

Work you deltoids for endurance. If you can`t keep your guard up you`ll be blocking with your face.

Try knuckle push ups, heavy-bag punching or some rope climbing to strengthen the tendons in you wrists. Don`t worry about the size of your forearms, but if your wrists are weak you`ll sprain them the first time your fist hits someone and slides off at a funky angle.

More than sixty percent of your punching power comes from your legs and waist. So squats, calf raises, and plenty of work for your core would be in order. I like the advice of going to a boxing gym and having someone walk you through the basic of power generation and footwork. It may seem boring, but good footwork adds power to your punches, make you harder to hit , and gets you in position to take advantage of your opponant`s mistakes.

Boxhead
Aug 08, 2007, 09:19 AM
What ounce gloves are you and your mates using?

BrutalityisLaw
Aug 16, 2007, 12:04 PM
I cant believe no one said sparring!!!! Bags dont hit back! Try if you have the evergreens to get some kettlebells. sandbags work great for a fullbody workout. But try to spar alot. That is everything you need to fight. Your body and mind get worked. Something you cannot do with workouts.

bretakmf
Aug 16, 2007, 12:08 PM
I cant believe no one said sparring!!!! Bags dont hit back! Try if you have the evergreens to get some kettlebells. sandbags work great for a fullbody workout. But try to spar alot. That is everything you need to fight. Your body and mind get worked. Something you cannot do with workouts.

i think that the idea of sparring is integral to a "fight club"--probably why no one mentioned it.

BrutalityisLaw
Aug 16, 2007, 12:15 PM
Maybe so but nothing works as good to prep for a fight then sparring. Alot better then pushups and situps.

Yaro
Aug 16, 2007, 12:25 PM
Ok I just read through most of these posts, and a lot of the advice given is wrong and almost infuriating.

I gather that the purpose of a "fight club" is to simulate fights in a more realistic manner.

In that case, cardio is only marginally useful: real fights do not have rounds. You do not hit each other over and over again until someone gets tired.
The first person to get in two decent punches/kicks wins.

It is all about speed.
There is not much point being able to do 5 one arm push ups if you don't have the speed to use that strength. Instead do plyometric jump-push ups.
Do the planche progression to increase being able to generate power quickly from almost a straight arm.

Do lots and lots of core work, especially obliques for maximizing upper body torque, and increasing ability to take torso blows.

DO NOT do sit ups! In combat you do not need your body to bend anteriorly, but remain tight and strong in a (mostly) upright position. Do dragon flags or easier variations. Learn to walk around with your abs flexed.

Do lots of grip work for grappling.

Increase hip flexor strength by doing straight-leg holds for increased kick speed.



Here is an example of a realistic fight (watch 1st 3 "rounds").
1 backhand slap like that and your vision goes blurry, your reflexes are slowed. That is all you need to be able to do to win.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPawnYu2HhY

bretakmf
Aug 16, 2007, 01:07 PM
i wouldn't take that--or any--fictitious movie clip to be an example of a real fight...esp one where the opponents are beginning in such a staged manner....a real fight won't start from a reference point with a still opponent who isn't guarding his face--that is straight fantasy-land.

you'll definitely want cardio--i doubt that your fight club fights will only last a few seconds--most likely, you'll fight and struggle for enough time to burn some serious energy--so train your body accordingly. fighting burns a lot of energy in a brief period of time--esp if you grapple/wrestle much. long slow distance stuff won't help with phosphagenic and glycogenic energy expenditures, but brief, intense GPP training will.

if you train ground game at all you'll need situps--you use that type of contraction in sitting up from bottom guard, e.g. definitely do lots of oblique, erector, and neck work. in general, make everything strong in every way. technique is great but i've won many fights by simply overpowering my opponent with strength and aggression--and i mean real fights in prison and in society, not just in the ring.

also--be aware of your environment--use it against your opponent--if you can smash someone's head into a wall with a lot of force it will always end it. this for real situations, not with your friends, of course.

keep in mind that most serious encounters--where someone really has it in for you--will come in the form of ambush. these are waaaaay more difficult to defend against--and often there will be weapons involved--this is another reason why it's important to be aware of your environment, and your body in relation to it.

Fatman
Aug 17, 2007, 06:55 AM
i wouldn't take that--or any--fictitious movie clip to be an example of a real fight...esp one where the opponents are beginning in such a staged manner....a real fight won't start from a reference point with a still opponent who isn't guarding his face--that is straight fantasy-land.

"My kung fu is stronger than yours!"

In fights outside the staged environment of the gym the best strategy is to get the hell out of there. If that option is not available, then get as big and strong as possible and prepare yourself mentally for aggression. The movie industry has created this twisted image of the small skinny guy kicking the crap out of several bigger opponents, and many people who attend McDojos and learn all about spinning kicks and dragon walking and all that crap have gotten seriously hurt when trying to apply that "knowledge" on a street bully.

Size and strength will not only prepare you for a fight, they will also deter about 70% of potential attackers. This is a fact. Even if you "look like Tarzan and play like Jane", most aggressive folks will be discouraged to try and pick a fight with you. Why are nightclub bouncers huge and muscular? To prevent potential conflict situations (and resolve the ones that arise with ease). If it was all about plyometric training and snuffing out candles with your punches they'd have Bruce Lee lookalikes working the doors.

jimi
Nov 05, 2007, 04:05 PM
me and one of my mates have been doing this kinda thing for a while, you would want to finish it early (even tho yur freindly you would want to finish it quick.) you need fast feet, faster hands, start in differant ranges and not like your boxing (walk to each other) give your self 1 min rounds and someone has to finish it. grappling, from talking to take down and knowing that you can get up and walk away without any more retaliation, this will make you gasp for air like anything... if you feel like you can 'go' again then do it , i always carry on untill i cant stand no more, i fall down bcos my leg strength has gone or i'm going to throw up. i've started 20 minute runs, with push ups,sit ups, low hurdles, pull ups every 3 minutes only bout 5-10 reps. and on other days 40 secs sprint followed by 2 mins walking rest. punch bag training you do need to hit the bag hard with lots of shots, but see how many (dont count) light punches you can do in say 10 secs (get a gymboss, XCELLENT) and reaction training hold a focus mit, turn it and tell your mate what punch to throw. you have to train very hard only then will you see where you are lacking and what you need to improve. i love this kind or training, i hope you do to

Dominator350
Nov 05, 2007, 04:29 PM
I just got a question... how old are you pushup man? and are you using boxing gloves?

zenbeast
Nov 07, 2007, 11:57 AM
And train with your mouth piece in.... Learn to breath right.... Jump rope....mouth piece in... run sometimes slow ...with mouth piece....

Just to add....It all get's different with a mount piece in.. you want to train that way...

Ok.... one more other than speed breath and endurance.... keep your hands up.... Most people do not train to have a hand up when you are striking.

NOTE: a punch goes out and your chin is down your other side is guard hand is up and your punch arm is in line...with your shoulder blocking your chin from the other side....

Do not take the chance that you open wide when you strike. Most good fighters can time you. Only make an opening when your setting them up to strike where you want...

judojack
Feb 03, 2008, 06:15 PM
also does size matter in a fight? does the bigger, heavier and stronger guy always win against a smaller opponent? because i weigh 93 kilos and i am 6ft 2 so i am big and strong(i can do 5 one arm pushups on each arm). but i have to admit that my punches are slow.


Sorry for the late reply here, but I had to add my two cents.

Size is important, but Dusty Morrison, a friend of mine with a 4-0 pro boxing record, weighs 205lbs and is 5'10". I am 6'6" 275 and not in all that bad of shape and he beats on me like I owe him money. And I've been boxing in the ring since I was 11 and I am 34 with a descent amateur record--- nothing special but ok.

Of course, he's 24.;)

Honestly, I think it's the size of the fight in the dog.

jkdman81
Feb 13, 2008, 09:21 AM
having slow strikes is never good
practice ounching speed i would suggest burnout drills
jab as hard and as fast as you can for 30 secs and build up to a full minute
do the same for combinations like( jab, cross), (cross, hook), (uppercut, cross), ect
that should be enough to get you started
and how much do you weigh in pounds cause it usually the more skilled and conditioned fight that wins not always the bigger guy

Dienekes
Apr 08, 2008, 09:13 PM
um i would just sugest working your legs, butt (and hams), and lower back a little more. as far as the big guy little guy thing goes:
Consider a more "Elastic" type of punch (thats the best way i can describe it...sorry), like be more concerned with your body being able to SNAP, as opposed to just laying into the punch.

I say all that to say this; the size of a fighter isn't a factor unless you know how to use it. Being slow is NEVER an option in fighting, if your size is slowing you down you probably should work on that.