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crazydan
Dec 13, 2006, 04:11 PM
When people say that they do MMA are they actually practicing multiple maital arts(IE. boxing, karate, jiu jitsu,) all at the same time. Or do they just take a martial art called MMA.

Moonduck
Dec 13, 2006, 07:31 PM
Yes. Both are correct. There are folks that practice many different styles, and call it MMA for convenience sake, and there are places that call what they teach "MMA". It's not a set style, if that is what you are wondering. It is an amalgam of multiple styles, usually composed of work in all four ranges.

crazydan
Dec 13, 2006, 08:11 PM
OO thanks a bunch. What are the four ranges? punching, kicking, grappling,...?

Moonduck
Dec 13, 2006, 08:20 PM
From farthest to nearest:

1) Kicking - basically anything out of the reach of your hands

2) Punching - somewhere inside the reach of your kick, but not quite to the point where you can elbow your opponent

3) Trapping - very close-range standing combat, elbows and knees work fine at this range

4) Grappling - self-explanitory

crazydan
Dec 13, 2006, 08:59 PM
oo I got it. thanks.

ole_chilli
Feb 13, 2007, 10:09 PM
Do not go to a place that teaches MMA .

if you plan on competing in MMA . Sounds funny I know , but it's like building a house . you must have a foundation to start . you need to either be a grappler and train some striking or you must be a striker and train some grappling .

If you try to learn them all at once you will not learn any well.

ME I am a judo Jiu Jitsu guy but i augment it with Muay thai . I am foremost a grappler but I have enough Muay thai to defend myself and open up a shot for the take down .

Moonduck
Feb 13, 2007, 10:44 PM
I wouldn't start at an MMA studio, but it can be useful for a more advanced student to train at a good MMA school. I say that almost entirely because of a need for transitions and proper blending of technique. An MT instructor can't train you to transition to grapple, any more than a grappling instructor can teach adding strikes in to grappling. A competent MMA instructor can teach transitions and blending because that is what he does.

That said, I'd prefer to get my striking instruction from a striker, and my grappling instruction from a grappler, etc. You get better quality of instruction from a specialist.

ole_chilli
Feb 13, 2007, 10:48 PM
I wouldn't start at an MMA studio, but it can be useful for a more advanced student to train at a good MMA school. I say that almost entirely because of a need for transitions and proper blending of technique. An MT instructor can't train you to transition to grapple, any more than a grappling instructor can teach adding strikes in to grappling. A competent MMA instructor can teach transitions and blending because that is what he does.

That said, I'd prefer to get my striking instruction from a striker, and my grappling instruction from a grappler, etc. You get better quality of instruction from a specialist.

there is no mma instructor .. what you have is guys who have trained all and now teach it. but they have a base they were something first they didn't learn them together . My muay Thai instructor is a stand up guy but he also holds a high rank in BJJ . MY BJJ instructor trains Muay thai with my MT instructor they blend together .

Moonduck
Feb 13, 2007, 10:59 PM
I disagree. Any JKD instructor is, by default, an MMA instructor. Insorfar as I am concerned, someone who has done multiple styles for an extended period of time, and teaches those styles as a blend, is an MMA instructor. You can still benefit from their experience in learning transitions, etc.

After all, you can come up with your own combat style by yourself, refine it over a few decades in thousands of fights, and create something unique with endless hours of work; or you can just sign up to a martial arts class somewhere and make use of someone else's experience.

Then again, I have a JKD background. It's all just technique to me.

ole_chilli
Feb 13, 2007, 11:06 PM
I disagree. Any JKD instructor is, by default, an MMA instructor. Insorfar as I am concerned, someone who has done multiple styles for an extended period of time, and teaches those styles as a blend, is an MMA instructor. You can still benefit from their experience in learning transitions, etc.

After all, you can come up with your own combat style by yourself, refine it over a few decades in thousands of fights, and create something unique with endless hours of work; or you can just sign up to a martial arts class somewhere and make use of someone else's experience.

Then again, I have a JKD background. It's all just technique to me.

then you are defining MMA as a literal meaning .
but who founded JKD . Bruce Lee a Gung Fu expert that was his base . he learned grappling from gene lebell and the likes . and from what I have seen of JKD instrutions it is based heavily in Gung fu . But the true JDK is more the mental Idea of taking what works from different styles . and throwing out the garbage that doesn't .But it still maintains a base foundation.

Moonduck
Feb 13, 2007, 11:14 PM
Well, this is getting into pedantics, but it depends on whether you are working with "Bruce Lee's JKD" (or whatever they're calling themselves these days", "Traditional JKD", or "JKD concepts" as your base. Traditional JKD and Bruce Lee's JKD are both very much based in Gung Fu. Traditional departs from it somewhat, going more with the style outline in the "Tao of Jeet Kune Do" which borrows more heavily from Western boxing and fencing.

JKD Concepts boils JKD down to its' essence, throws out the baggage and goes forward solely armed with a desire to reduce, reduce, reduce. As a result, it has no strong Gung Fu base, merely techniques taken from Gung Fu, same as technique taken from any other art. Many JKD Concepts type schools don't even teach a bit of Gung Fu.

If it is not obvious, I was part of a JKD Concepts group, not trad or "Bruce Lee's". That said, I define MMA pretty simply, and that is by the literal meaning. Multiple Martial Arts is self-explanatory. It is not a style so much as it is a grouping of styles. There is no need for a base depending on how it is instructed, though there will almost always be something that is stressed more. Human nature will cause that, as any instructor will have some range, style, or technique that is favoured, thus it will be emphasised, regardless of whether it is conscious or not.

In short, if a school teaches more than one style, and those styles are intended to be used together, it is an MMA school, whether intentionally or not, and whether it calls itself "MMA" or not. It's the old saw about quacks like duck, walks like a duck.

ole_chilli
Feb 13, 2007, 11:22 PM
well I was seeing MMA as what we see in the UFC type events now ..

and if you plan on competing you need a foundation period .

Cite MFS Mittetich sytems.

Early guys did extremely well , Why ? they were wrestlers who crass trained with Boxers and BJJ guys ..

Now they are just guys that come in and train them all at once . Resulting in guys who no submissions but no control or transitions or basic movements .
people who throw strikes but with pitiful form and no head movement .

they know some of everything but understand the principles of none .

Moonduck
Feb 13, 2007, 11:27 PM
Ah, I see, MMA as sport.

I have to agree. I enjoyed the early UFC's more. Better technique. More and more the trend seems to be towards a style-less mish-mash of technique used by people who are great physical specimens, but not actual technicians. It lessens the worth of the event IMO.

ole_chilli
Feb 13, 2007, 11:28 PM
Ah, I see, MMA as sport.

I have to agree. I enjoyed the early UFC's more. Better technique. More and more the trend seems to be towards a style-less mish-mash of technique used by people who are great physical specimens, but not actual technicians. It lessens the worth of the event IMO.

Now we see eye to eye.

Se how much better things are when everyone agrees with me :lol:

Moonduck
Feb 13, 2007, 11:36 PM
:lol: :lol: :lol:

Luke
Feb 13, 2007, 11:40 PM
BWAHAHAHAHAHAHA, Jeet Kune DO??!?! BWEAHAHAHAHAHAHA

Please tell me that I made a mistake and that "JKD" stands for "Junior Karate Demonstrator".

crazydan
Feb 14, 2007, 03:03 PM
wats wrong with jeet koon doe? im not a big fan either but I never heard it was bad.