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MasterFlex
Oct 26, 2006, 08:29 AM
When you throw a front kick does your standing foot point in the direction of the kick or to the side.
I found that if it points to the side the kick can reach further. Somehow in Traditional Japanese karate they often kick with standing foot pointing forward, which in my oppinion takes away from full power of the kick.

Does anyone understand what I am talking about?

plancheismine
Oct 26, 2006, 02:30 PM
yeah i think you need to rotate it to the side for more power and length

cheesedog
Oct 26, 2006, 03:44 PM
While it is true that you will have a little longer reach by turning your base foot to the side, your front kick will be much more powerful if you point your base foot toward your target. The reason for this is simply because you can thrust much more powerfully with your base leg if your foot is forward. You will push with the strength of your quads, hams, glutes, etc. Turning your base foot to the side diminishes your thrust considerably.

Moonduck
Oct 26, 2006, 07:46 PM
Depends. Are you doing a push kick? Or a heavy front kick? Or doing a fast snap kick? Your overall body dynamic depends on what you are trying to do with the kick.

kevbfc
Nov 02, 2006, 10:06 AM
if you kick with your standing foot to the side it enables you to thrust more hip in to it thus giving more power this is the way i was taught in muay thai ,so ive got to disagree with cheesedog, i definatley get more power if i turn base foot to side ,by the way ive done karate as well as muay thai .hope this helps .

Celcius
Nov 02, 2006, 07:06 PM
I will not put my oppinion in here.

I did read about a study (can't find it now) that the strongest front kick is when it is started with supporting leg pointing forward and pivoting to the side as the kick is executed. If distance is under the kickers control.

pusher
Nov 23, 2006, 12:24 PM
I sort of agree with cheesedog. I have always put the foot forward, so that the base leg is solid. However, if you have to overextend the kick, then you would have a tendency to turn the base foot, in order to get more reach. What I like to do, if I have to cover some distance, is when I do the kick, I just push off on the supporting foot at the same time that I kick. ( Timing has to be when the lower leg extends, not when the knee lifts up to chamber the kick ) This lets me sort of shift forward maybe a foot or so, which can surprise an opponent, who thinks you are well out of range for a kick. The harder you kick , the further range you can travel.
YOU DONT WANT TO JUMP HIGH IN THE AIR!! This is to cover distance, and slam that kick in. Just skim the foot over the floor.

crazydan
Dec 31, 2006, 04:00 PM
In American kickboxing when you do the front kick do you lift your knee up first or no? Thanks alot

Moonduck
Dec 31, 2006, 06:07 PM
In American kickboxing when you do the front kick do you lift your knee up first or no? Thanks alot

Depends on your target. If you are doing a fast, low, there is no need to pick the knee up high. Just go from the floor. Might not be legal to kick low in actual matches though.

You should also bring your knee up if you want to do a push kick, instead of a snap kick. You won't generate any pushing power without bringing the knee up and getting the hips into the kick.

BOy2k
Jan 08, 2007, 04:50 AM
in american kickboxing there are 2 types of front direction kicks.

standard front kick:
standing foot facing forward, raise kicking leg knee and kick out straight
in a pushing motion and hitting out with the ball of your foot.

rising kick:
standing foot facing forward, leg raised with slight emphasis on knee then snap the foot up for connection with target. you hit with the top part of the foot for this kick.

the only kicks you would turn your standing foot for are roundhouse front, roundhouse rear, side defensive, side offensive and step in sides.

isaiah.chentnik
Dec 16, 2007, 11:15 PM
When you throw a front kick does your standing foot point in the direction of the kick or to the side.
I found that if it points to the side the kick can reach further. Somehow in Traditional Japanese karate they often kick with standing foot pointing forward, which in my oppinion takes away from full power of the kick.

Does anyone understand what I am talking about?

I naturally turn my foot out to do front kicks, not much though, maybe 10-30%, depending. I think it kind of depends on your hip/leg alignment & flexibility. You kind of want to make sure you put your weight on your planted/grounded foot's toes and lean to the instep/inside of your foot This is important for balance. From there I think whatever comes natural will probably serve you the best.

(kind of an answer): Some Karate (I don't know about all) teaches to move your planted foot into position first and to keep it grounded/planted no tip-e-toes. This gives you more friction/traction = more power & better balance, especially on a roundhouse or sidekick.
However, if you twist your foot, even on a front kick, that means that your heal probably came up on it's toes at one point (hopefully your not pivoting on your heals).
In TKD, going up on your tip-e-toes works to your benefit because it speeds up kicks by enabling quick rotation. However, you don't have to worry about grappling or punches so much because it's TKD. I would say if your worried mostly about kicking then rotation isn't the worst thing. If doing more of a push kick toes will need to be pointed forward. This will allow you to push with your planted foot as well as raised foot. You see more push kicks in Muay Thai.

So high snap kicks I just can't tell you because personally........

I think some of those high front kicks are more for show than anything.
If you're trying to snap kick your opponent (striking with instep), which would only really work on the groin or inner thigh you want more speed & power so twist if your going to but do it before and keep your foot planted. If you're trying to push them (using bottom/ball of foot w/ toes up), which is probably the second most effective thing to do with a front kick then I would say your probably better off keeping you planted foot more straight so you can get more pushing motion. I find it very doubtful a high front kick will do you any good except for dynamically stretching your legs (actually a good idea). The chances of you catching someone on the chin is pretty rare/lucky. Maybe a high crescent kick is more practical for high kicking and I have to pivot my ground foot to accomplish that. So... I would say, what you do should depend more on functionality than tradition, unless your instructor says "you have to".

isaiah.chentnik
Dec 17, 2007, 12:17 AM
In American kickboxing when you do the front kick do you lift your knee up first or no? Thanks alot

I think that depends on where the American learned it, ;)! Usually more swing = more power vs. more knee/bend = more speed/snap. So.. A whipping motion is going to give you the best combination of speed and power for a kick. Quite literally if you have ever cracked a whip you see that you need swing and bend for a nice crack.
A front kick is intuitively more of a snapping or pushing motion. In A front kick the knee needs to lead the kick regardless, to what extent relies on the functionality of your kick, read on........

If your doing a push kick, having your knee well bent will give you pushing motion. Straight legged is no good. Push yourself away from a wall and you will see. Straight legged and you can only hope to swing at an opponent.

If your doing a snap kick, I would suggest leading with the knee regardless. In TKD they teach to lead with the knees because your looking for a snap type kick or a lot of knee action. These can be pretty quick and precise but won't always transfer a lot of momentum or weight to you opponent. If your kicking the groin (front kick type thing) more knee because less power is needed but speed/snapping is useful and the groin is fairly vulnerable. Remember what I said about whipping though! And in American kick boxing your not supposed to kick in the groin so you may want to put some swing on it from the thigh and hips for a stomach shot.

If you doing more of a roundhouse type thing but borderline front kick...... Like if you are kicking someones legs out from under them, less knee/snapping and a little more swing from the thighs and hip. This will give more power but will be a little slower. Do this because kicking someones legs out from under them isn't a speed finesse type of thing, it can be blunt, quick, whatever...... but NEEDS to be powerful, especially if they're big and heavy.

Erik
Dec 17, 2007, 01:08 PM
The question I would ask here is why are you doing the front kick?

If you want to generate maximum power, then the straight foot looks to be the way to go.

If you're using it as a feint to bridge the gap and distract your opponent, letting the foot pivot would maximize your distance.