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-TM-
Oct 11, 2006, 06:04 PM
hey im currently in muay thai kickboxing, and i am interested in starting ju-jit-su.

any1 here take it or has taken it?

can people tell me about it plz?

Barrett
Oct 16, 2006, 05:07 PM
I've tried both, currently doing Jitsu. And I feel that jitsu is good for holding people down, and throws and such. But if you cant get in for a good throw, Muay Thai can be used to knock someone onto there ass, and Jitsu can be used to hold them down there, locks, arm-breaks, joint breaks etc

plancheismine
Oct 16, 2006, 08:52 PM
muay thai=for big brawls or when you don't want to go down
jiu jitsu=one on one. choke out.

-TM-
Oct 17, 2006, 10:17 AM
kk thnx guys.

next year when i start high school i'm going into mixed martial arts with 2 friends.

and i'm doing muay thai atm for striking and stand up. i found a pretty good brazilian jiu-jitsu place nearby i might take.

even as im taking mma i will continue with muay thai and jiu-jitsu :lol:

plancheismine
Oct 17, 2006, 05:34 PM
kk thnx guys.
next year when i start high school i'm going into mixed martial arts with 2 friends.
and i'm doing muay thai atm for striking and stand up. i found a pretty good brazilian jiu-jitsu place nearby i might take.
even as im taking mma i will continue with muay thai and jiu-jitsu :lol:
8) I wanna get in mma or BJJ :x
are you in the 8th grade too?

-TM-
Oct 17, 2006, 06:10 PM
kk thnx guys.
next year when i start high school i'm going into mixed martial arts with 2 friends.
and i'm doing muay thai atm for striking and stand up. i found a pretty good brazilian jiu-jitsu place nearby i might take.
even as im taking mma i will continue with muay thai and jiu-jitsu :lol:
8) I wanna get in mma or BJJ :x
are you in the 8th grade too?

grade 9.

i think muay thai and bjj will be good training for mma.

and i've never been in a martial art b4 where i got over a white belt... so it's kinda a plateu i wana break.

i want to stick with bjj and eventually......get a black belt :twisted:
=p

VingTsunMonkey
Oct 17, 2006, 06:21 PM
BB in BJJ: 10-15 years. Tough ride indeed, but worth it.

I wish I could find a good Muay Thai gym around here, unfortunatly the only guy who teaches around here is a JOKE. Same w/ BJJ, luckily, we have a student who knows MORE than the teacher (he's a black belt whilst Mr. Smith is only a blue), and he fills in a lot of the holes Mr. Smith doesn't. Since I can't find a good boxing gym around here, I just take a very specialized style of karate and train it religiously.

Moonduck
Oct 17, 2006, 06:48 PM
It's actually tough to find a good boxing gym.

-TM-
Oct 17, 2006, 10:28 PM
BB in BJJ: 10-15 years. Tough ride indeed, but worth it.

I wish I could find a good Muay Thai gym around here, unfortunatly the only guy who teaches around here is a JOKE. Same w/ BJJ, luckily, we have a student who knows MORE than the teacher (he's a black belt whilst Mr. Smith is only a blue), and he fills in a lot of the holes Mr. Smith doesn't. Since I can't find a good boxing gym around here, I just take a very specialized style of karate and train it religiously.
10-15 years? you serious?
most martial arts take like a couple years to get a black belt.. 3 at most.

i assumed bjj was 2-5 years for a bb

but in a year i should still learn enough to help me in mma right?(note : i am not qitting MT or BJJ when i take up mma)

plancheismine
Oct 18, 2006, 06:53 AM
BB in BJJ: 10-15 years. Tough ride indeed, but worth it.

I wish I could find a good Muay Thai gym around here, unfortunatly the only guy who teaches around here is a JOKE. Same w/ BJJ, luckily, we have a student who knows MORE than the teacher (he's a black belt whilst Mr. Smith is only a blue), and he fills in a lot of the holes Mr. Smith doesn't. Since I can't find a good boxing gym around here, I just take a very specialized style of karate and train it religiously.
10-15 years? you serious?
most martial arts take like a couple years to get a black belt.. 3 at most.

i assumed bjj was 2-5 years for a bb

but in a year i should still learn enough to help me in mma right?(note : i am not qitting MT or BJJ when i take up mma)
a few months of bjj would be good 8)
and bjj is not another cheesy martial art where they hand out belts every month.

-TM-
Oct 18, 2006, 10:03 AM
BB in BJJ: 10-15 years. Tough ride indeed, but worth it.

I wish I could find a good Muay Thai gym around here, unfortunatly the only guy who teaches around here is a JOKE. Same w/ BJJ, luckily, we have a student who knows MORE than the teacher (he's a black belt whilst Mr. Smith is only a blue), and he fills in a lot of the holes Mr. Smith doesn't. Since I can't find a good boxing gym around here, I just take a very specialized style of karate and train it religiously.
10-15 years? you serious?
most martial arts take like a couple years to get a black belt.. 3 at most.

i assumed bjj was 2-5 years for a bb

but in a year i should still learn enough to help me in mma right?(note : i am not qitting MT or BJJ when i take up mma)
a few months of bjj would be good 8)
and bjj is not another cheesy martial art where they hand out belts every month.

the place i found says the guy who created the gym comes down from brazil twice a year to grade for belts/teach our teachers more.

how many belts/what colors are tehy in bjj?

plancheismine
Oct 18, 2006, 03:46 PM
it goes white blue purple black. i think

VingTsunMonkey
Oct 18, 2006, 04:18 PM
White, Blue, Purple, Brown, Black. I'm in my 2nd year and I have a blue belt, and still VERY much to learn. The reason it takes so long isn't because there are innumerable techniques, but because of all the ways of applying that technique. The number of positions you could be in, level of resistance, skill of attacker... it all plays a major factor in how effective any one technique is going to be, so a great deal of training goes into knowing what's appropriate when... feeling out your situation.

-TM-
Oct 18, 2006, 06:06 PM
White, Blue, Purple, Brown, Black. I'm in my 2nd year and I have a blue belt, and still VERY much to learn. The reason it takes so long isn't because there are innumerable techniques, but because of all the ways of applying that technique. The number of positions you could be in, level of resistance, skill of attacker... it all plays a major factor in how effective any one technique is going to be, so a great deal of training goes into knowing what's appropriate when... feeling out your situation.

wow awsome i cant wait!

so if you passed all tests you could get a bb in 2.5years?

Moonduck
Oct 18, 2006, 06:48 PM
I did Sombo for about ayear. I got yellow tips for my white belt, and was told that I could get my yellow whenever I wanted. We didn't do formal tests, and didn't pay much attention to belts. The only colours that mattered were red and blue, because those are the colours used in competition sombo. Other than that, the belt was there to keep your kurtka (jacket) shut, and give your opponent a handle to grab you with.

Belts are overrated. The techniques you learn are what matters.

plancheismine
Oct 18, 2006, 08:24 PM
Belts are overrated. The techniques you learn are what matters.
:wink: that's right when you get good your belt gets higher as a reward.
i want to get into BJJ! :cry: i think me wrestling background would help

-TM-
Oct 21, 2006, 12:24 PM
hey guys i just started bjj and i've got to tell you it's absolutely amazing!

took 2 classes so far but i've learned so much.

going to sign up on monday for 6months and get a gi and all that :)

o and my instructors said that to get a stripe on your white belt-you need to learn the first 25 techniques and have all of them mastered and memorized.

and then for your first belt(blue) you need 4 stripes on your white. so 100 techniques.

she said it usualy takes 2+ years for your first belt.

and that she's been training 9 years and is a purple belt. so she said about 12years of training is required for a black belt.

i love it thought-we warm up, then learn some take downs/getting into guard and stuff like that diff chokes you know-then we practice them for a bit, then we practice everything we've leanrewd, then we spar for like 25mins!

gotta say without a doubt bjj is the best ma i've ever done!

Moonduck
Oct 21, 2006, 12:32 PM
i love it thought-we warm up, then learn some take downs/getting into guard and stuff like that diff chokes you know-then we practice them for a bit, then we practice everything we've leanrewd, then we spar for like 25mins!


Grappling is one of the best cardio workouts I've ever done. It gives a solid workout, if pursued vigourously, and it is also fun. It's good stuff.

I wish I had the time to get back into it =(

-TM-
Oct 21, 2006, 02:29 PM
i love it thought-we warm up, then learn some take downs/getting into guard and stuff like that diff chokes you know-then we practice them for a bit, then we practice everything we've leanrewd, then we spar for like 25mins!


Grappling is one of the best cardio workouts I've ever done. It gives a solid workout, if pursued vigourously, and it is also fun. It's good stuff.

I wish I had the time to get back into it =(

ya dude my shirt was soaked at the end and my head was steaming i was so tired.. but it's the funnest thing i've ever done.

you should try and do it like once a week if you don't have too much time.

i only do it twice a week for 1 and a half hours and it doesn't seem like too much.

plancheismine
Oct 21, 2006, 02:43 PM
going over the stuff and practcing it in sparring is good, gets you used to the situation. we do a lot of live wrestling and it's good

what takedowns did you learn????

-TM-
Oct 21, 2006, 04:07 PM
going over the stuff and practcing it in sparring is good, gets you used to the situation. we do a lot of live wrestling and it's good

what takedowns did you learn????

umm not sure what its called i'll explain it to you.

you had your hand son the outside of your oponents shoulders
then you step through his legs and drop to your knee as you reach around and grab his leg then put 1 arm on his left leg.

then move your foot up more and jump to the side...

bad at explaining lol i think its called the high croch take down or something?

then i learnt 2 ways of getting out of a mount and i learn like 6 chokes and how to arm bar

we wrestle alot at school and every1 cant believe how good i've gotten after 2 days of bjj(i dont tell them i take it)

they were just like whoah how the hell did you do that?!?!?!
lol

Moonduck
Oct 21, 2006, 04:36 PM
you should try and do it like once a week if you don't have too much time.

My problem is that I work 50-60 hours a week, and the closest studio that is worth anything is about 50 minutes drive away. Add in a family, and you have a recipe that prevents me from making any sort of meaningful committment to any sort of useful MA training.

The real killer is that most of the studios around here charge you the same whether you come one night a week or five. It blows.

plancheismine
Oct 23, 2006, 09:57 PM
:x i posted a long post and isn't there!!
that was a bad high crotch description :lol: do you drop your knee down when you shoot in???

where do you wrestle at school?

fcastigl
Nov 26, 2006, 08:29 PM
Keep doing your Muay Thai too, that'll be a great combo with BJJ. If you want to get into MMA in the future throw in some freestyle & grecco wrestling and you'll be really well rounded.

As far as how long it takes for a BB in BJJ it really depends on the student (how much you train and how quickly you pick up the techniques). There are a couple of guys that have gotten it in under 4 years, BJ Penn and Mike Fowler are the most well-known American guys that have done it. I would say average is around 7-8 years with really consistent traning (3-4 x a week at least). We have 3 brown belts at my school, they just got promoted and have trained for 6 years each 4 or 5 days a week.

For reference, I've been training for about 2.5 years and have a blue.

Good luck with the training!

Remedy
Nov 28, 2006, 12:39 PM
Hey guys - this is my first post, but I saw this topic in the forum and figured it was one thing I could talk about right away.

I did about 8 years of Muay Thai Boxing, about 10 years of Tae Kwon Do, about 1 year of Kenpo, and right now I'm studying BJJ under Travis Lutter (you may have heard of him).

Without a doubt BJJ is the most essential martial art I have ever been exposed to...The practical application of every technique is amazing. It is the one martial art that I have seen that actually prepares you for a real fighting situation. I won't quote any statistics, but surely no one would disagree that most street fights usually end up going to the ground. Second to BJJ is Muay Thai Boxing. It is a very brutal style of fighting and is a great addition to any martial arts program. With Muay Thai you don't waste your time going through impractical forms and unrealistic blocks and strikes (think knife hand, reverse punch, crescent kick, double form arm block - I could go on and on). IF you are serious about MMA you have to be very good at both BJJ and Muay Thai boxing in my humble opinion. I'm only a white belt in BJJ right now - I've only been training for a few months. I go to class about 9 times a week though so I'm making a lot of progress. I've come to this website in search of a practical work out routine I can do just about anywhere because as I said I go to BJJ 9 times a week and actually still do a little TKD (we have a TKD club at my work but it's mostly just for the workout and to help teach some of the beginners). I don't really have time to go to a gym to lift weights so I've started doing pushups and situps at home. I saw a video for this website on break.com and figured someone here may be able to help me with a work out routine. Cheers

plancheismine
Dec 02, 2006, 04:45 PM
o and my instructors said that to get a stripe on your white belt-you need to learn the first 25 techniques and have all of them mastered and memorized.

and then for your first belt(blue) you need 4 stripes on your white. so 100 techniques.
!
looking back at this...that is a lot of technique and unrealistic for the first belt.....you can't just know a lot, you need to be good at the ones you do and get them on everyone.....100 techniques would be a lot for a black belt, i bet

pusher
Dec 10, 2006, 09:22 PM
Bjj is very strong in its ground work, no doubt there. However, if you want to learn to take someone to the ground, I would suggest Judo. Judo is very strong standing up, and in the methods of taking someone down.
Actually, quite a few techniques in BJJ , chokes / leglocks, etc ( which are forbidden in Judo now ), were part of the training before. Then Sensei Kano took these techniques out, for safer training.

Heathen warrior
Dec 18, 2006, 02:06 PM
Most people's exposure to ju-jutsu is through the UFC and similar cagefighting competitions, and they see the Brazilian version of this ancient Japanese art. BJJ is optimized for the tournament, but only it covers one section (tatami-waza) of the ju-jutsu curriculum. A traditional ju-jutsu school also teaches various standup techniques, such as throws and come-alongs, that are not taught in most BJJ dojos. The dojo I studied at had some kickboxing too, just enough to learn where and when to get in for the takedown.

ole_chilli
Feb 13, 2007, 10:05 PM
Most people's exposure to ju-jutsu is through the UFC and similar cagefighting competitions, and they see the Brazilian version of this ancient Japanese art. BJJ is optimized for the tournament, but only it covers one section (tatami-waza) of the ju-jutsu curriculum. A traditional ju-jutsu school also teaches various standup techniques, such as throws and come-alongs, that are not taught in most BJJ dojos. The dojo I studied at had some kickboxing too, just enough to learn where and when to get in for the takedown.

you can not compare TJJ with BJJ .. TJJ is taught as a siter art to judo and mostly crap .

I hold ranks in Judo BJJ TJJ I also train Muy Thai wrestling and yoga .
If you want to do MMA you must have Muay Thai and BJJ . But you will need to augment it with a a take down system . Bjj has some but they don't spend much time on it . the best thing to do is work on some good wrestling take downs as judo takes longer to master .

Moonduck
Feb 13, 2007, 10:31 PM
If you want to do MMA you must have Muay Thai and BJJ .

Do what? As much as I enjoyed Muay Thai myself, it is not the end-all, be-all of striking arts, and BJJ is not the alpha and omega of groundfighting. They are effective, sure, but not required.

I trained in Sombo, and consider it superior to BJJ *overall*. As you said, a BJJ player will need additional work in takedowns. You'd have that already in Sombo, as it balances groundwork with how to get to the ground in the first place. You also don't need to take Sombo for 15 years to be considered good at it. Groundwork is not everything in grappling, yet that is what BJJ really focuses on. The groundgame only works if you can get there.

That said, I'm not dogging BJJ. I'm just saying that you don't *need* it. Damn, there's plenty other groundfighting styles out that that get the job done. Just ask a whole plethora of UFC, Pride, etc champions. Sure, there's pletny of BJJ players in there, but plenty who do other arts instead. And those that did something other than BJJ got there faster =P

Same with MT. I've watched a savateur flat own a Muay Thai player. The MT guy just couldn't touch the savateur, while those savate pieds were everywhere at once. There are dozens of striking arts that work just fine. MT just happens to be effective and relatively easy to learn.

(NOTE: I consider MT to be *almost* essential to a canny MMA player. Unlike BJJ, it is quickly picked up, and well-rounded for a striking style. I just disagree that you *must* do it.)

There is no single magic combo to MMA.

Moonduck
Feb 13, 2007, 10:34 PM
On a secondary note, TJJ isn't crap. It just has an entirely different focus than BJJ, regardless of the naming similarities. TJJ is more stand-up grappling, and the technique reflects that. A police officer, for example, would be far better served with proficiency in TJJ than BJJ, for instance. Different needs are suited by different arts, and TJJ and BJJ are almost apples and oranges.

ole_chilli
Feb 13, 2007, 10:42 PM
On a secondary note, TJJ isn't crap. It just has an entirely different focus than BJJ, regardless of the naming similarities. TJJ is more stand-up grappling, and the technique reflects that. A police officer, for example, would be far better served with proficiency in TJJ than BJJ, for instance. Different needs are suited by different arts, and TJJ and BJJ are almost apples and oranges.

They are I hold rank in both and the TJJ stuff as taught is mostly party gimmicks that aren't really ever going to be practical

Moonduck
Feb 13, 2007, 10:51 PM
Sad, too. TJJ used to be more serious. It's cool to see what the Brazilians have done with it, honestly. Still, there's a lot of useful technique in TJJ. I just don't see myself ever taking TJJ by itself. It would be something to mine technique from.

ole_chilli
Feb 13, 2007, 11:09 PM
Sad, too. TJJ used to be more serious. It's cool to see what the Brazilians have done with it, honestly. Still, there's a lot of useful technique in TJJ. I just don't see myself ever taking TJJ by itself. It would be something to mine technique from.

brazillians didn't really take TJJ it was more Judo .which is closer to what original Jiujitsu was

Moonduck
Feb 13, 2007, 11:24 PM
*shrug* It means little difference to me. Again, it something to mine technique from. Personally, I find judo to be more useful than TJJ, and BJJ to be more useful than either. Regardless of where the Brazilians got it from, I like what they did with it. :D

ole_chilli
Feb 13, 2007, 11:29 PM
*shrug* It means little difference to me. Again, it something to mine technique from. Personally, I find judo to be more useful than TJJ, and BJJ to be more useful than either. Regardless of where the Brazilians got it from, I like what they did with it. :D

Indeed .. I eat sleep and breathe BJJ

Moonduck
Feb 13, 2007, 11:41 PM
A lot of people do. It's like a cult, but with more hand-to-hand training :P

ole_chilli
Feb 13, 2007, 11:43 PM
A lot of people do. It's like a cult, but with more hand-to-hand training :P

It's like a drug that gets in your system

Dr. Peebody
Mar 03, 2007, 10:01 AM
I did Sombo for about ayear. I got yellow tips for my white belt, and was told that I could get my yellow whenever I wanted. We didn't do formal tests, and didn't pay much attention to belts. The only colours that mattered were red and blue, because those are the colours used in competition sombo. Other than that, the belt was there to keep your kurtka (jacket) shut, and give your opponent a handle to grab you with.

Belts are overrated. The techniques you learn are what matters.

thank you for someone finally saying this.

trey martin
Apr 04, 2007, 06:48 PM
i have been in jiu jitsu for ten yaers and i still hven't reached the black belt it takes the average person two years a belt in bjj of course there are phenoms out there who have done it in two years but that is very rare.it does not matter what art you choose if you work hard at mastering said art,that being said do not think that a black belt in any martial art means you are unbeatable.now go train hard :wink:

Scooby
Apr 09, 2007, 10:53 PM
Wow you younger guys are going to be beasts by the time your old enough to fight mma, I've been in BJJ for three years now and its important to make the distinction between sport jiujitsu and combat jiujitsu, one is much more applicable to the street, I've been making the switch from sport BJJ to mma and the change isnt hard just have to stick closer to your opponent when your on the bottom cuz you'll eat a few punches if not!