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plancheismine
Sep 07, 2006, 01:31 PM
I don't do any MA's yet. :cry: BUt I wrestle and practice hitting the heavy bag. I also watch UFC and want to get into BJJ. 8)
ANd My style would be takedown and then Ground n Pound.

Sep 07, 2006, 01:39 PM
Unless you are fighting someone who won't let you take them down. ex. Chuck L.

plancheismine
Sep 08, 2006, 11:56 AM
Unless you are fighting someone who won't let you take them down. ex. Chuck L.
true....In that case I would have to be a very good striker or wait until he tires 8)

TiogaJeep
Sep 08, 2006, 02:50 PM
Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and MMA

plancheismine
Sep 08, 2006, 02:52 PM
Cool! BJJ what belt are you?

MainFrameSoldier
Sep 09, 2006, 05:19 PM
I plan on BJJ and Kickboxing

VingTsunMonkey
Sep 09, 2006, 05:33 PM
Wing Chun Kung Fu, BJJ.

I'm also a 2nd Dan in Tang Soo Do, but I don't currently take it.

I think BJJ is raised on WAY to high of a pedestal. I enjoy it, but it's highly overrated for ANYTHING outside the ring.

Angelic Upstart
Sep 22, 2006, 03:25 PM
I studied Karate twice in my life for a total of three and half years, recently have taken up Wing Chun as part of my recovery (see my intro post) as well as the forms and stepping techniques, the class i attend practises the applications of the forms in a reality situation, so the forms are not consisting of punching air but can be applied to provide test of your technique, good stuff i am enjoying it .

Moonduck
Sep 22, 2006, 06:54 PM
I've studied a number of different arts over the years. My favorite, by far, was Sombo. Second to that was the mix of Kali-Silat, Muay Thai, and Ving Tsun trapping rang maneuvers taught by the PFS group I was in. Also done Kempo, Judo, and Western Boxing (probably my overall favorite pure striking style, and the one I enjoyed training in more than any other striking style).

Or you could boil all of that down to "Whatever Works", aka JKD.

plancheismine
Sep 23, 2006, 01:30 PM
cool list. isn't sambo like wrestling?

Moonduck
Sep 23, 2006, 08:07 PM
cool list. isn't sambo like wrestling?

Sort of. It has a lot of emphasis on takedowns and groundfighting, but also teaches strikes, kicks, and some trapping. Well, it does depending on the style, of course. Largely though, it's a grappling centered art.

It's good stuff. It combines a lot of the effectiveness of Judo with the brutal efficiency of the Russian mindset. Good stuff. The training was brutal though.

plancheismine
Sep 25, 2006, 05:54 PM
what's trapping? in sambo if you are on your back are you pinned? then is there any guard?
how old r u?

Moonduck
Sep 25, 2006, 06:25 PM
Trapping, in a very basic sense, is extremely close-range stand-up combat. I you are really up in somebody's grill in a fight, your' in trapping range. Think of it as close enough to swing an elbom and hit them with it, or like the 'clinch' in boxing. Trapping range is a great place to be if your opponent likes to do long-range attacks, or has reach on you.

Sombo can be taught as a combat style or a sport style. Unlike Judo, and especially Tae Kwon Do, sport style is very secondary to the combat style. As a result, while the guard is utilised, it isn't used to the obssessive extent that it is in BJJ. Don't get me wrong, there's some really good stuff in BJJ, but they go too far with the Guard. Wearing someone down by keeping them in the Guard for 20 minutes simply isn't an option in most real streetfights. But that is more of a tactical problem with some schools of BJJ than a core fault with the style itself.

And I am in my 30's.

VingTsunMonkey
Sep 25, 2006, 06:43 PM
Trapping is what we Ving Tsun folks do best 8)

Gotta love it, especially when you're goin toe to toe with TKD people... they have NO idea what to do lol

Moonduck
Sep 25, 2006, 08:10 PM
Gotta love it, especially when you're goin toe to toe with TKD people... they have NO idea what to do lol

No kidding. And, I agree. Ving Tsun does do trapping better than any other art that I've personally experienced. Though I will say that adding in Filopino and Indonesian techniques should be considered mandatory. Pananjakman and panantukan (probably spelled that incorrectly) should be mandatory styles for proper trapping IMO, and th eIndonesian stuff I learned taking some Silat was just purely viscious.

That said, when pressured, I revert to training. I punch like a boxer, kick Muay Thai style, and grapple like a Sombo player. My trapping is more designed to get me past punch defense and apply pressure prior to the grapple. Overall, I use the stuff I trained the most in, thus boxing and Sombo.

The saddest part about MA is that you can learn everything that you really need from a given MA in the first 6 months of instruction. This is because the majority of MA's teach the basic skills only for the first 6-12 months, minimum, and basic stuff is what will keep you alive in a fight. Flying kicks, and spinning maneuvers, and all that are just chi-chi. They don't get you anywhere unless you're trying to impress somebody. Learn the basics, and practice them. A lot.

VingTsunMonkey
Sep 25, 2006, 08:44 PM
True. With many of the arts out there they get into totally unnecessary things.. but a lot of it has a rich history and purpose in the art itself. I took Tang Soo Do for a very long time, and questioned the GM about flying kicks. He finally clarified: high flying kicks are to take people off horses.

I always carry faith in the older arts (not like TKD and modern sport arts), they were developed to kill, plain and simple. They saw their purpose in war and personal protection in those days. Not speaking for all arts of course, just a majority of those I've studied or taken.

A great example is how people question kata/forms so much. The REAL reason they were developed was as an encyclopedia of technique to carry on the art because in the old days literacy was rare amongst the poorer class.

There's always an underlying purpose...

plancheismine
Sep 26, 2006, 03:15 PM
i'd say muay thai is the best clinch style of fighting

VingTsunMonkey
Sep 26, 2006, 05:53 PM
For the ring, I'd agree. If a MT guy put a Ving Tsun guy with equal experience in a clinch, it'd be like standing in a blender in any other situation however

:)

plancheismine
Sep 26, 2006, 06:41 PM
For the ring, I'd agree. If a MT guy put a Ving Tsun guy with equal experience in a clinch, it'd be like standing in a blender in any other situation however

:)
ving tsun do you use knees and elbows?

VingTsunMonkey
Sep 26, 2006, 07:25 PM
Extensively.

Our particular school uses a great deal of knee 'stomp' kicks, headbutts, throat shots, finger breaking and the like. It's a style that's entire purpose it to fight at forearm's distance from your opponent. Phonebooth fighting, if you will. Ving Tsun is ALL about deflection and simple motion, basically it's the king of blocking styles. The entire class focuses on drilling deflection of an attack or series of attacks in repetitions by the hundreds. The second I see an elbow, my body just moves, I don't think about stopping it, I just do. Elbows and knees are easy to deal with in a clinch situation in this respect with this style. One of my favorite tricks for dealing with an elbow is to elbow it. Hook it with the underside of your arm and pull down with your lats. Like you're drawing a sword and swinging it over your heard... sort of...

With the momentum from that motion... say you blocked a right elbow with your left arm, you'd follow through and drive a right hook into the side of their neck. Game over :-D

Moonduck
Sep 26, 2006, 08:01 PM
There's always an underlying purpose...

They may have purpose, but they lack relevance. Short of taking on horse-mounted police officers or marauding cowboys, training in high kicks is silly. It is also rarely presented as a tactic to be used against horseman. It is taught largely as an impressive stunt. Useless.


For the ring, I'd agree. If a MT guy put a Ving Tsun guy with equal experience in a clinch, it'd be like standing in a blender in any other situation however

A comparatively soft blender though. Your school may well be different, but the few places I've dealt with that are VT schools rarely did sufficient conditioning, practical body hardening, and serious contact sparring. MT schools, on the other hand, are all about it.

That said, MT often sacrifices proficiency for conditioning, preferring to produce hard fighters, over brilliantly skilled one. This is not truly all that bad though, as good conditioning will frequently win over good skill in a real fight.

NOTE: When I studied MT, it wasn't as part of a MT school, but as part of my overall PFS training. As a result I never went through the insane amount of body conditioning that real MT fighters go through. We just got a taste of it now and then when the instructor was feeling sadistic. So, I do not claim to be a hard MT fighter, and never was. I just appropriated the stuff what worked from it, same as everything else.


Phonebooth fighting, if you will.

Perfect description of trapping range combat. Leave it to the VT guy to use such a cool phrase for it =)



The entire class focuses on drilling deflection of an attack or series of attacks in repetitions by the hundreds. The second I see an elbow, my body just moves, I don't think about stopping it, I just do.


Yup, pure muscle memory. Even having been out of MA for a number of years, the body still remembers quite a bit. I recently had a spill on my mountain bike, and I just naturally fell exactly how I'd been taught and practiced so many times. All the way down to one arm coming out to the side and my hand coming up (Sombo teaches you NOT to slap the mat like Judo does, as the slap could be interpretted as a tap out submission in Sombo). I was surprised at it, but quite pleased that I was unhurt.

VingTsunMonkey
Sep 26, 2006, 08:23 PM
Conditioning has an importance in the ring, but if someone's out to hurt me real bad, I'm going to grab their hair, grab their testicles, kick them in the knee like I'm trying to kick down a tree, crush their throat, whatever it takes to exploit their body's weaknesses.

"In Ving Tsun, we strive to kill or maim, no matter what the size or skill of your opponent. You must always assume he is better, faster, stronger, smarter and more skilled than you are, and fight him on this assumption. You must exploit his weakness in defense to crush his anatomical weakness." - Jeff Kohlman

We have a school called AMAFA down the road from us, American Martial Arts And Fitness Academy. They specialize in manufacturing MMA guys. A few of those MMA guys stroll down to our kwoon every month (no fail) to prove how superior their skills are. A few of them were so humbled, they're now students lol. I can't nearly say this for all VT schools though, our sifu trained in China for over a decade to teach the way he does. He lives in Flint, Michigan (one of the nastiest places to live in this state) and has 3 teen daughters. He knows what works and what doesn't and enforces it.

In a fight, you don't have time to sit and try and gain positive clinch position, a good MT fighter knows now to throw a knee if he doesn't have dominant position, cuz he'll get swept or taken down. We know this much: deflect attackattackattackattack. Deflection is typically only necessary when you're attacking and they attempt a counterattack, and should only have to happen once, if that. You don't wait for them to seriously injure you, the second that first strike is thrown you send them to the hospital.

Moonduck
Sep 27, 2006, 12:02 AM
Conditioning has an importance in the ring, but if someone's out to hurt me real bad, I'm going to grab their hair, grab their testicles, kick them in the knee like I'm trying to kick down a tree, crush their throat, whatever it takes to exploit their body's weaknesses.

*shrug* Having been in a few real fights, the ability to control my opponent and slam him hard to the ground has proven far more valuable than all the groin kicks and eye-sticks I learned in many, many, many Kempo lessons.

(Note: I'm mentioning Kempo because I took it, and it has a reputation in the MA community as being nothing more than groin kicks and eye-sticks. And it is a well-deserved reputation.)

The other problem with lack of conditioning and contact sparring is that neither you, nor I, nor anyone else is perfect. If I get into a fight, no matter how good I am and how bad/drunk/whatever the other guy is, he may just land a lucky shot and pop me square in the nose. If I've never been socked good in the face, I won't know how to react properly to it.

In other words, you've got to take a punch in training to be able to take apunch in a real fight.



"In Ving Tsun, we strive to kill or maim, no matter what the size or skill of your opponent. You must always assume he is better, faster, stronger, smarter and more skilled than you are, and fight him on this assumption. You must exploit his weakness in defense to crush his anatomical weakness." - Jeff Kohlman

No offense, but phrases like that get you in trouble if you use your MA to defend yourself and hurt somebody. I like plausible deniability.



We have a school called AMAFA down the road from us, American Martial Arts And Fitness Academy. They specialize in manufacturing MMA guys. A few of those MMA guys stroll down to our kwoon every month (no fail) to prove how superior their skills are. A few of them were so humbled, they're now students lol.

Yup, and the big reason there is that MMA has become a sport, and is debased. It's like Judo and TKD. Nothing more than football or basketball. A sport, with a bit more blatant brutality.



I can't nearly say this for all VT schools though, our sifu trained in China for over a decade to teach the way he does.

This may sound crazy, given all the negative things I've said about TKD, but I know a TKD instructor that is the same way. He's an older Korean fellow, that learned TKD some 60 years ago, and moved to America long after. He taught old-style TKD to his advanced students, and they were some seriously dangerous cats. He retred though, and all his studio teaches is sport crap. Booo.



In a fight, you don't have time to sit and try and gain positive clinch position, a good MT fighter knows now to throw a knee if he doesn't have dominant position, cuz he'll get swept or taken down. We know this much: deflect attackattackattackattack. Deflection is typically only necessary when you're attacking and they attempt a counterattack, and should only have to happen once, if that. You don't wait for them to seriously injure you, the second that first strike is thrown you send them to the hospital.

Actually, yeah, in a real fight, you can take the time to gain positive clinch. It's quick to attempt, not that tough to do, and, if you're doing it right, you're controlling your opponent anyway. A well-done clinch against the average joe on the street is a very capable way of handling issues.

That said,, I'm not dogging VT. Like I said, it was one of the arts that I happily pilfered technique from. I was just making the comment that the schools I knew didn't do enough conditioning and sparring. I'm sorry, but you just flat can't learn to properly defend yourself without live sparring. Witness Mike Tyson's horrible performances after getting out of prison. sure, he was in diesel shape, but his timing, distance, and footwork were all crap, all because live sparring is a no-no in prison. He got dull, and fought like crap. He only won, when he did, because his natural ability is stunning, and he hadn't totally lost everything.

VT has some killer concepts. The Straight Blast being one of the biggest, as well as sweet low kicks from the rear legs, and of course all the trapping. It also has some bad ideas IMO. That stance is murder on the knees, as well as putting the arms in a horrible position for anything but pure linear centerline attacks. And the foot work is WAY too linear, or at least it was in the VT practitioner I've ever seen. Then again, VT emphasises the centerline over all else, right? against most people, damned if it doesn't work too.

The lack of conditioning and contact sparring strikes me as being endemic to the various "gung fu" schools in general. I can't recall a single kwoon that I ever saw, or even heard of hereabouts, that did serious sparring. Bad idea.

VingTsunMonkey
Sep 27, 2006, 12:20 AM
In general, I agree completely. Many kwoons out there are powderpuff versions of what Ving Tsun was meant to be. I was lucky enough to find a reality based school with strong principles and lots of live sparring. I live in a real rough neighborhood, I've been robbed at gunpoint, I have a pretty strong understanding of what works and what doesn't. My neighborhood is what got me into MA to begin with, I was tired of getting my head bounced of lockers and being beaten just because I'm caucasian.

The reason it's so linear in many cases is because that's what's taught right off the bat, because it's an effective principle appliable from day one. Ving Tsun was once used to quickly train soldiers. When you get deeper into the system, you find that Ving Tsun has circular blocks (drum technique), lots of turning, and even hooks. It's because these motions take a tad longer to perfect than the 'straight blast', but applied correctly they're more economic than the forward principle.

Another common problem with Ving Tsun is it's practitioner's tendency to sit and block things. Our kwoon emphasizes being viciously aggressive and using the blocking and trapping to counter an opponent's attack in the process. That's what Chi Sao is FOR, when a fist gets in the way of your attack, you want to deal with it right away without having to watch their arms, and instead pay attention to their body's overall movement. People don't cross arms when a fight starts, but it's bound to happen once it begins (at that range).

If you look at the way the teaching structure is put together, you'll see MUCH sense in how it would fit the 'insta-train' ideal. Of course, back in those days, people didn't train for 8 hours a week, they trained 8 hours a DAY, as my sifu did for a decade.

We also don't believe in no physical conditioning. It's true that you don't NEED strength to overcome someone, but that's with PERFECT VT principle application. Which doesn't happen. Being strong doesn't hurt at all. We do pushups, shoulder squats, bagwork and full contact padded sparring frequently to condition ourselves.

It really makes me sad to see people packaging a sickly little version of a powerful martial art into a perfectionist's fantasy.

"The best defense is a good offense".. kind of a broad statement.. but look at people like Ramon Dekkers and Muay Thai's "Iron Mike"... :shock:

Moonduck
Sep 27, 2006, 07:19 AM
Yessir, powderpuff kwoons is a good way to describe. Sad too.

Damn, all this chatting about MA makes me miss doing it...

riku
Sep 27, 2006, 01:24 PM
I tend to go on yo-yo -type training: get into something, get interested deeply, work out hard, then work out too hard, got a burn-out/loose interest and, well... either return after a while or jump into something else. I've been training or still am at least this kind of things: Shotokan style Karate, Aikido, Sin Moo style Hapkido, Shorinji Kempo. Basics of some other arts have been introduced to me, too, but these mentioned I got somehow ranked. And I got MP group leader/corporal training over military service: less... traditional but had certain elements of combat skills, too.

Riku

amorelli
Sep 27, 2006, 05:17 PM
What did you think of aikido? I'm interested in a defensive art to study probably starting this summer and I have an uncle who has studied for many years. He is untouchable - he's around 55ish and still in good shape, but I've got about 20 pounds of muscle on him. Every once in a while we're messing around and it develops into a pseudo-sparring match (he's a really cool guy) and he just stands back, arms at his side. I'll throw a pretty hard punch at his shoulder, he'll wave his arms, and I'll be on the ground unable to move because he has complete control of my arm. Needless to say, I'm pretty impressed and thinking about studying it, also because the idea of solely a defensive art interests me as somewhat of a pacifist (though if you push around one of my friends, especially some of the girls I grew up with, you better watch out, if you know what I mean).

I know it's not suitable for MMA fighting - I'm not interested in ever fighting unless completely forced or possibly for sport. I'd much rather hurdle the nearest fence and just keep running. Helluva lot safer, IMO.

Moonduck
Sep 27, 2006, 07:03 PM
Aikido can be very, very cool. That said, it has its' limitations. I won't go too far into them, because it is largely personal preference. An example would be that it isn't aggressive enough for my tastes. So, as you can see, it is personal taste.

My only substantial concerns with Aikido is its' almost total focus on soft-style takedowns and single limb holds after takedown. It has its' merits, sure, but there are some situations where you really do just need to swat the other guy, and Aikido doesn't teach you. I am also concerned that Aikido doesn't do sparring, more of an uke/tori thing in an overly controlled environment. Again, if you don't take punches in training, you'll not survive them in practice.

The second part should be expected though, and I would say it about any art that does not seriously do sparring.

Heck, I made some mildly disparaging comments about the Kempo training I had. I spent more time with Kempo than any other single art, and learned quite a bit from it. But the real reason I did was that my instructor was a former Silver Gloves boxer and a semi-pro kickboxer. He believed in sparring, and was perfectly happy to teach boxing and kickboxing techniques and tactics. The Kempo stuff was almost ancillary by comparison.

VingTsunMonkey
Sep 28, 2006, 12:10 AM
Aikido is rewarding in many aspects, but it REALLY depends on the school you attend. Where I take Ving Tsun, the day after all 3 classes the building is used by Aikido people. I've watched classes, and I can say in some aspects I'm impressed and in others I'm not. It all depends on how you train of course. Just because your school doesn't offer sparring doesn't mean you can't incorporate it into your personal usage of the art. Just find a friend who wants to have a friendly throwdown and train with him a couple times a week. The experience is irreplacable.

Moonduck
Sep 28, 2006, 07:20 AM
Just because your school doesn't offer sparring doesn't mean you can't incorporate it into your personal usage of the art. Just find a friend who wants to have a friendly throwdown and train with him a couple times a week. The experience is irreplacable.

If you are already skilled, this is a good thing. It works even better if said friend is already involved in what you do. Otherwise, it can be bad. If you are new to your training, you can very easily hurt your partner or yourself. I harp on sparring in class so hard because there is an instructor present. Presumably your instructor is competent enough to essentially referee a sparring match, and make sure no one gets hurt.

Additionally, it helps greatly to have a knowledgable observer watching the sparring match to be able to give both parties involved corrective advice. It is very easy to become too focused on the match, and not pay enough attention to what you're doing.

riku
Sep 28, 2006, 12:10 PM
As other have already pointed out, Aikido schools comes in very wide variety. The soft, take-down -oriented art can be teached or used in very very harsh way.

Personally I don't know much - well, nothing at all would be closer to truth - mixed martial art competition and tactics/techniques suitable there. However, a friend of mine, doing Brazilian Ju-Jutsu (which, as far I've understood it, is well recognized in MMA circles) claims that there's certain similarity in tactics and strategy between Aikido and BJJ altough techniques vary.

It's also matter what you're looking for your martial art training. Not everyone is combat-oriented, not everyone works in such an enviroments in such a jobs that constant training to self-defence/use of force -skills is needed. Several elements of martial art training can be easily seen connected to general body weight training ideas, too.

Riku

amorelli
Sep 28, 2006, 05:09 PM
Thanks for the responses.

-amorelli

Moonduck
Sep 28, 2006, 08:01 PM
As other have already pointed out, Aikido schools comes in very wide variety. The soft, take-down -oriented art can be teached or used in very very harsh way.

The 'harsh' version of Aikido is Aiki-jutsu, a bit different. They share the same roots, much like Judo and Ju-jutsu. In general (with Japanese styles), "do" indicates a more peaceful style, practiced for the various health benefits and sports use. "Jutsu" indicates the more visceral combat form.


However, a friend of mine, doing Brazilian Ju-Jutsu (which, as far I've understood it, is well recognized in MMA circles)

That's a bit of an understatement =)



claims that there's certain similarity in tactics and strategy between Aikido and BJJ altough techniques vary.

There are some very basic similarities in style, and a few interesting similarities in tactics. BJJ is much more of a "yielding" style than Japanese Ju-jutsu. BJJ players can get honestly passive at times, the Guard being the premier example.

riku
Sep 28, 2006, 11:59 PM
As other have already pointed out, Aikido schools comes in very wide variety. The soft, take-down -oriented art can be teached or used in very very harsh way.

The 'harsh' version of Aikido is Aiki-jutsu, a bit different. ---.
Let me put it different way, then: I am not qualified to define what is *true* Aikido or *true* Aiki-jujutsu. However, school claiming to teach aikido can teach the art of curriculum in such a way that techniques used in full force & intention will be very devastating and efficient. Hence, depending on what potential student is seeking, s/he should take a good look to the school, not the label of art. This is true often with martial arts as well, altough situation can be somehow underlined in Aikido.

Riku

VingTsunMonkey
Sep 29, 2006, 12:41 AM
One thing about Aikido is how people bash it for how soft it is.

If you throw someone into the concrete, and they don't know any ukemi (proper falling), they're going to either break something or end up with some very nasty scrapes.

Moonduck
Sep 29, 2006, 07:27 AM
Erm, most Aikido throws aren't properly throws. At least not the ones I'm used to seeing taught. They are soft takedowns. Aikido specifically avoids trying to injure the opponent. Judo, on the other hand, frequently attempts to throw one's opponent somewhere into the next time zone. I know, I've had it happen to me. Thank goodness for lots of falling practice.

Note: This is not a bash. Just a comment. I think Aikido is a very cool art, and one of the few truly soft arts that has a chance of succeeding in self-defense. I am just very aware that it does not suit my personality.

riku
Sep 29, 2006, 08:37 AM
Erm, most Aikido throws aren't properly throws. At least not the ones I'm used to seeing taught. They are soft takedowns. ---.
I agree, but only partly. Let's take throws like tenchinage or kaitenage, for example: it does'n even have to be concrete if the a)opponent don't know how to land properly or b)opponent is not allowed land properly - guy will land onto neck. With speed.

Locks, and take-downs connected to locks are usually done with gentle way in training, yes. That is because if you yank lock tight withouth giving time to go down in controlled way, you'll cause at least a strain and run out training partners.

Riku

plancheismine
Sep 29, 2006, 05:53 PM
apparently aikido takes a while to get good at....but most of the throws are when the person is charging at you :roll: in a real fight that usually doesn't happen. It is also hard for an aikido person to catch a strikers wrist to wrist lock them.....so stick with wrestling :wink:

Moonduck
Sep 29, 2006, 07:40 PM
I agree, but only partly. Let's take throws like tenchinage or kaitenage, for example: it does'n even have to be concrete if the a)opponent don't know how to land properly or b)opponent is not allowed land properly - guy will land onto neck. With speed.

Locks, and take-downs connected to locks are usually done with gentle way in training, yes. That is because if you yank lock tight withouth giving time to go down in controlled way, you'll cause at least a strain and run out training partners.

*shrug* I've always learned that what you do in training is what you'll do in a fight. I've also experienced it personally.

That said, it is certainly plausible that the adrenaline and uncertainty of a fight will cause you to apply said technique faster and harder than in training.

riku
Sep 30, 2006, 12:01 AM
apparently aikido takes a while to get good at....but most of the throws are when the person is charging at you :roll: ---
Really? Are you sure?
Riku

plancheismine
Sep 30, 2006, 01:39 PM
apparently aikido takes a while to get good at....but most of the throws are when the person is charging at you :roll: ---
Really? Are you sure?
Riku
yes. :) or lunging at them. when they are practicing against someone with a knife the person just lunges forward and misses :roll:
wrestling> aikido
bjj> aikido
judo> aikido
muay thai> aikido :wink:

riku
Sep 30, 2006, 02:33 PM
Ok. Well, since internet debates about martial arts soon enough go to yes-no -level, and to describe the possible attacking methods of uke even from aikido beginner's course would take quite much time (and obviously need to be explained), I'll drop the subject :roll: :roll:

Riku

Moonduck
Sep 30, 2006, 03:40 PM
Avoidance is very Aikido.

plancheismine
Sep 30, 2006, 09:52 PM
Ok. Well, since internet debates about martial arts soon enough go to yes-no -level, and to describe the possible attacking methods of uke even from aikido beginner's course would take quite much time (and obviously need to be explained), I'll drop the subject :roll: :roll:

Riku
lol this one guy was talking about going to an aikido class and they were practicing catching punches and the kid was whining about the way the guy was punching at him (try that in a fight :wink: ) :lol:

Moonduck
Oct 01, 2006, 12:45 AM
To an extent, I agree. This goes back to reverting to training, as I mentioned before. If you are not used to someone coming at you hard and fast, you'll have a lot of trouble handling it if someone does just that. I've not see much in the way of aggressive, capable technique used by the assailant in Aikido.

Varg05R6
Dec 10, 2006, 11:14 PM
My background is in Muay Thai & Wing Chun.

Thinking of having a go at Bujinkan Taijutsu too.

One of my closest friends has been studying Aikido for about 10 years. I can eat him alive at kickboxing and trapping range but once the grappling begins he ties me up like a pretzel :oops:

samurai69
Dec 11, 2006, 08:17 AM
I have been training in and teaching aikido, for a number of years

i also train in muay thai and jogo de pau (stick fighting)

in the past i have trained in

wing chun
shantung black tiger KF
western boxing
shotokan karate
some ju jutsu

also some judo and fencing when i was at school

Doug
Dec 12, 2006, 06:19 PM
I train in Choy Li Fut Kung Fu. I trained in Aikido for two years before i started Kung Fu.

NuMack
Mar 02, 2007, 09:33 PM
I started in Shaolin Kung-Fu at 7. Have studied Tae kwoon Do, taijutsu, and JKD(More a personal journey). Learned wrestling from my uncle(State Champ in Highschool) and dad. Both of which did alot of streetfighting in there day, and taught me how to fight. Also exchanged techniques with my Aikido friend, a Kempo guy, and a MMA friend. And been in Capeoira the longest, or rather have lived Capeoira the longest.

Boxhead
Mar 29, 2007, 11:10 PM
I am not currently training because of college, however I have trained in Muay Thai and Krav Maga 1 year total.

warriorscholar
Jun 10, 2007, 05:12 PM
I study a Korean Martial Art named Hwa Rang Do. It teaches a wide range of skills from traditional "art" to street fighting.

hara_12
Jun 10, 2007, 09:50 PM
I study Kuk Sool. Similar in family to Hwa Rang Do.

Stormy
Jun 11, 2007, 09:30 AM
i train in Kali - particularly Dog Brothers Martial Arts. Intense stick fighting. I love it!

desperado11288
Jun 20, 2007, 02:15 PM
I had about a year of Tae Kwon Do as a little kid (boy, that sucked), then went through a BJJ and Muay Thai phase about a year and a half ago, but stopped after 6 months. I've been doing Capoeira now for about a year, and have definitely found my niche there.

Torre
Jul 18, 2007, 09:57 AM
I train in wado-ryu karate since I was 13 (21 now), and I love it. It incorporates a lot of jujitsu techniques as well as some very aikido-like movements. It puts a lot of emphasis on being soft, but we still do semi and full contact sparring with grappling allowed. :smile: I also started capoeira about two years ago, and I love it. Plus contrary to popular belief, it has some very good techniques for actual fighting :smile:

juszczec
Jul 25, 2007, 02:52 PM
Japanese style karate (think Shotokan with an open mind) since 1982.
Jujutsu, standing and on the ground, maybe 7 years or so.

I help run a karate/jujutsu program out of a health club in the Akron area.

Mark

tumpaijohn
Jul 28, 2007, 12:02 PM
I don't do any MA's yet. :cry: BUt I wrestle and practice hitting the heavy bag. I also watch UFC and want to get into BJJ. 8)
ANd My style would be takedown and then Ground n Pound.

Have you ever heard of Catch wrestiling? It is an awsome form of submision wrestiling that is wrestiling based. all the fundementals of wrestiling apply. why start to learn BJJ, and have to re-learn or apply other principals to your training of summissions. check it out online and think about it.

juggledex
Jul 28, 2007, 03:32 PM
Yes! Catch wrestling, real good stuff. I found a lot of it real easy to learn and understand .

rawmark
Jul 28, 2007, 04:00 PM
Krav Maga is the choice for me. Just makes sense for real world applications.

fatdragon
Sep 03, 2007, 02:00 AM
currently I'm studying Kyokushin Karate, we treat both striking and grappling as important parts of Karate.

Daido Juku Kudo looks pretty cool, haven't trained in it though. (videos)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M5AvCcLwaJQ
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=5869307558314227439&q=kudo&total=3831&start=0&num=10&so=0&type=search&plindex=7
http://youtube.com/watch?v=usCbSgt-zls

sulsa
Sep 03, 2007, 01:00 PM
I study a Korean Martial Art named Hwa Rang Do. It teaches a wide range of skills from traditional "art" to street fighting.
Another Hwarang! Cool :)

I studied Hwarangdo for 7 years and got my 1st degree black belt and instructor certificate. That was about 8 years ago though... ;)

daeinwolf
Sep 03, 2007, 11:01 PM
Studied JKD concepts for 10 years, MMA concepts 3 yrs, European Fencing per Fabris style, SPEAR system (informally) 2 yrs.

All fun stuff.

neckcranker
Sep 04, 2007, 12:45 AM
Submission Wrestling. I love takedown training and enjoy the submission game. The two together make a very fun activity for me to do.

Chico
Sep 11, 2007, 11:21 PM
Started boxing today, really fun.

crazydan
Sep 13, 2007, 02:20 PM
i box so if you hve any questions feel free to ask

Erik
Sep 13, 2007, 02:41 PM
Black Belts: Moh Kempo (found only in Canada, eh), Shaolin Kenpo
Brown Belt: Alambra style Arnis de Mano

Dabbled in: Aikido, kung fu, Woo Gar Mo Sut, police & RCMP hand-to-hand

Studied by way of book: military hand to hand combat (modern & WWII), chin-na (chinese joint locking), san-shou (Chinese throwing technique), juijutsu, judo, kenjutsu, boxing, wrestling, various esoteric forms of kung fu, Western rapier, broadsword and smallsword technique,

And the reason for studying all that was that I spent 10 years studying and directing stage combat, including: single sword broadsword, smallsword, rapier & dagger, rapier & companion, martial arts, unarmed combat, spears, knives, sticks, chairs, clothes, found weapons, and anything else we could think of and/or try.

One of my favorite fights I designed followed the stage direction "they fight by the ears a while." Now that was fun! :)

tumpaijohn
Sep 13, 2007, 07:04 PM
Boxing is an under-rated American martial art, although I don’t feel it is a complete style that covers all ranges of fighting it is the most affective punching range style, in my opinion. Good luck and train hard.

Adriaan2000
Sep 16, 2007, 05:33 PM
Goju Ryu and ITF Tae Kwon DO

charolastra00
Sep 16, 2007, 08:41 PM
I'm the only person in kokondo here.. sad! I feel like it's a more regional form since it was created about 50 years ago in central Mass and is now more or less headquartered in CT- but there's quite a large following in Israel and Finland, apparently.

It's also not as aggressive as most of you seem to like. It focuses more on defensive moves. Since I'm at a pretty low fitness level in general, this seems like it will work better for me to get into more a more intense fitness regime. Also, as a 19 year old girl who regularly walks around Boston and (soon to be) some of the more economically depressed cities of Latin America, I feel that this will work well for me.

I've also done tae kwon do (4 years in elementary/middle school.. then the instructor was arrested as a child molester :\) and capoiera for a few months last year before an ankle injury took me out of commission. Eventually I'd like to get into aikido, hapkido, or Brazilian jiu jitzu.

Fatman
Sep 17, 2007, 05:05 AM
I've also done tae kwon do (4 years in elementary/middle school.. then the instructor was arrested as a child molester :\)

LOL :) :) :)

Sorry, I know I shouldn't think that's funny... but it's like something out of a South Park episode.

tumpaijohn
Sep 17, 2007, 10:51 PM
Wow!

there is nothing wrong with the hands on method of martial training. well unless your a Cho Moe...........................

Adriaan2000
Sep 19, 2007, 06:50 AM
I stopped doing TKD yhis year, it just wasnt taking me anywhere, although I reached 4th kyu. I went over to Goju Ryu and I must say that in the eight months that I have been their I became harder and tougher then ever. I must also say that my Sensei is a gruelling teacher and we do a LOT of conditioning, for example 320 bodyweight squats a session and thats only the beggining.

Trarup
Sep 25, 2007, 03:42 PM
I was in japanese juijitsu for about 9 months, And have been doing Kempo Karate for the past 2.5 years. managed to work my way up to green belt in it, so only another 5-7 years till i test for black...

just remember that the concept of ground and pound fighting is very flawed if you intend to rely on it in real life situations. Yes if your good at it you can destroy your opponent, but if your on the ground with a guy, and he has a friend with steeltoes, guess who loses the fight.

waylon
Sep 30, 2007, 08:49 PM
gracie jiujitsu is the best in my opinion jus most schools dont teach it the way it should be taught they leave out the self defense part

waylon
Oct 01, 2007, 12:27 AM
if your by yourself and fighting a guy with a friend with steel toe boots you will probally lose any way wheather its on the ground or not i think it would be difficult to deal with two people trying to bust your head no matter what you train

Erik
Oct 01, 2007, 09:04 AM
Depends on how fast you can drop the first guy.

waylon
Oct 01, 2007, 01:15 PM
yea but i wouldnt wanna rely on hoping that i could drop one guy before i get dropped not saying it cant be done jus saying you would need some luck any way thinking other wise is lying to themselves and probally never been in a real fight

Erik
Oct 01, 2007, 01:55 PM
Quite true.

TheSwedishChef
Nov 21, 2007, 11:26 PM
I did TKD as a kid.
I did about 3 1/2 years of a shaolin family style that incoporated a fair amount of ground fighting.
4-ish months of an internal/soft applications style called Fook Yueng Chuan.
1 month of private lessons in Sun Family style taijiquan.

After the holidays I plan to start Wing Chun... which I've wanted to do for years. Don't know why I never did.

Dienekes
Dec 07, 2007, 06:17 PM
i love taichi, bagua, and kung fu in general.
I fight with basic kung fu.
i guess my style would be... fight em till you win style! lol

pedro luiz paulucci
Dec 08, 2007, 05:33 AM
I want do shaolin kung fu and ninjutsu, but at my country, Brazil dont have any school that teach this.

Dominator350
Dec 08, 2007, 06:14 AM
Id hit a heavy bag if i could but ultimately i think the objective that goes through my mind is the ground and pound, its the only realistic strategy for the street. However standing at 6 feet there are people who are bigger and heavier then me so it wouldn't hurt to master a teeth shattering knockout punch either... collapse the right side of his face you know what im saying...

Erik
Dec 08, 2007, 10:15 PM
Id hit a heavy bag if i could but ultimately i think the objective that goes through my mind is the ground and pound, its the only realistic strategy for the street. However standing at 6 feet there are people who are bigger and heavier then me so it wouldn't hurt to master a teeth shattering knockout punch either... collapse the right side of his face you know what im saying...

I"m not sure if ground and pound is the right strategy for the street. Generally, a***oles run in packs, so if you take one guy down his buddies will probably be there to take the boots to you, plus it's harder to spot a knife when you are grappling on the ground.

The US army's hand to hand combat manual used to be centered around "thump him and dump him" which sounded like pretty good advice to me: hit him hard, knock him down, stay on your feet.

Fairburn's WW2 commando combat manual "Get Tough" also advocated jumping on your opponent afterthat, but that way lies jail time.

None of this, by the way, negates the importance of knowing how to fight from the ground. I just don't see it as a good strategy to want to be there.

praenin
Dec 09, 2007, 04:24 AM
yea i agree with erik taking someone to the ground might be good in the UFC but best to be avoided on the street, still should kno it tho just incase you cant avoid it. the MA's i take are ninjutsu (with aliveness), jujutsu, sambo, muay thai, a little boxing, and a little san shao (chinese boxing), and ill be starting judo in the spring semester as a college course so that pretty sweet. one of my life gaols is trying a little bit of everything and take what works

Dominator350
Dec 09, 2007, 02:16 PM
This is true, but what i mean or forgot to mention was if some haggard crackhead tried to knife me id knock him on his ass so hard... if he was much bigger though obviously id have to keep distance no sense in getting tangled with someone whos much taller and heavier.
Its funny were talking about this i moved to a haggard ass part of town recently for school. The other day 2 homeless people, one of them so cracked out he forgot how to speak, the other raging cause i wouldn't give away my groceries, i mean i had no food in my house at the time i don't got time for a job. And these crackhead like 20 years older then me raging at me i couldn't believe it. The colder it gets i guess the more desperate they get. Its a maniac neighborhood 3 women got stabbed in the face down the road a few months back.

praenin
Dec 09, 2007, 04:18 PM
damn what school do you go to

Silumguy
Jan 28, 2008, 08:52 PM
I started martial training with jun fan kung fu (I think thats spelled right), which I did for about 6 months. I then did northern shaolin for about 2 years. Finally, I have been studying Tai chi for about a year now (mostly yang style, but I have learned a few movements in chen and sun style, the more martial versions of tai chi). I also learned very small amounts of kali, judo, and western boxing.

Yuri
Jan 29, 2008, 02:24 PM
i started with playing soccer 'its good for getting strenght in my legs, but afterwards bit harder to be more flexible'. after 7 years of soccer i did judo for 2 years, and now im doing Kung Fu 'hung gar style' over 3 1/2 years. I like kicking and palm style thats why im studieing these arts.

If someone knows more about palm arts pls let me know

Silumguy
Jan 29, 2008, 03:57 PM
If someone knows more about palm arts pls let me know

Northern Shaolin has quite a few palm strikes and is known for high kicks (someone once told me that taekwondo borrowed heavily from it, but I don't know how true this is). Also, in most Northern schools I have heard of, they teach some form of iron palm training that toughens your hands considerably (I know from experience). Northern Shaolin movements are quite a bit more fluid and graceful than hung gar and not quite as hard and agressive.

juggledex
Jan 29, 2008, 04:08 PM
If someone knows more about palm arts pls let me know

Pancrease?
http://youtube.com/watch?v=2A9SjPhC0pM

Yuri
Jan 30, 2008, 07:16 AM
thnx for your reply. its hard to find a school that teaches northern shaolin style and teaches the right/good arts 'like the ones in china' here in holland. i even know a "sifu" who teaches students from videos he watches... and thats what im trying to avoid.

here is a youtube file that shows a high form of the hung gar im studying.: http://nl.youtube.com/watch?v=-VQW55fdJxA tiger, crane form from my grandmaster himself when he was younger though... he shows tiger, crane and elements.

Silumguy
Jan 31, 2008, 08:58 PM
its hard to find a school that teaches northern shaolin style and teaches the right/good arts

Yeah, tell me about it. It is extremely hard to find a traditional chines martial arts teacher nowadays. After my Northern Shaolin sifu moved away, I couldn't find another teacher for about a year and a half. Luckily, I found my Tai Chi (which also has a lot of palm striking and pushing, although almost no kicking) instructor, who had actually trained in China.

My best advice for finding a traditional school is to go to any demonstrations or gatherings you can. In my experience, there are always little martial arts schools popping up around the place. I actually found my current instructor at a chinese new year gathering. I find that tends to be a good time to find traditional Chinese intructors and luckily, it is coming up very soon.

Anyways, good luck in your hunt and here is a pretty good video I found of a form I began learning, but unfortunately never finished. The guy isn't a master, but he flows very well: http://nl.youtube.com/watch?v=DfLhto6H6i8

cheesedog
Feb 01, 2008, 02:07 AM
Isn't that the Plum Flower Fist form? Learned it years ago, my memory may be a bit faulty.

Silumguy
Feb 01, 2008, 11:33 PM
Yes it is. The form is Shaolin #7/Moi Fah/Plum Flower. Good eye.

brianlkennedy
Feb 02, 2008, 04:12 AM
Greetings from Taiwan, I am kind of new here so I thought I would chime in on this thread to say what I do. On the traditional Chinese side; xingyi (hsing-i), Cheng style pakua (bagua) and Taiwanese Crane Boxing (did Bucksam Kong's hung gar way back in my college days).

On the modern side: western boxing, a bit of judo, about 6 months of Brazilian jiu jitsu and submission wrestling. That was with Andy Wang when he was here in Taiwan.

take care,
Brian

judojack
Feb 03, 2008, 06:26 PM
I box a little at a local gym and I practice Judo at the local university. My instructor is also a level 2 US Army combatives instructor.

I have studied JKD, Kempo, Kali, Krav, Kyokusin, GoJu, TKD, Savate, MT, and wing chun. However, of that laundry list I only practice a few Krav moves, Savate kicks, and I work a few Kali drills.

I've tasted a little of everything, but my stomach is far from full.

jacktheblack
Feb 03, 2008, 07:54 PM
I fence and practice European art forms. My studies are mostly in the wrestling and short blade forms from western Europe and southern Europe respectively. I have been a marshal of fence for the SCA and I have won a few tournaments.

blambell
Feb 05, 2008, 05:14 PM
I have been studying historical European martial arts for the past two years. Its a great mixed martial art system covering fighting with weapons (longsword, sword and buckler, spear, dagger and more), grappling and limited groundwork. Its a highly efficient and pragmatic form designed to end fights quickly by whatever means necessary.

jacktheblack
Feb 05, 2008, 05:26 PM
I have been studying historical European martial arts for the past two years. Its a great mixed martial art system covering fighting with weapons (longsword, sword and buckler, spear, dagger and more), grappling and limited groundwork. Its a highly efficient and pragmatic form designed to end fights quickly by whatever means necessary.

Are you working with the Society for Creative Anachronism (SCA) ?

blambell
Feb 05, 2008, 05:52 PM
No, I have no affiliation with the SCA. At the moment I am working under the banner of the Association of Renaissance Martial Arts but I really consider myself more of an independent scholar of the art.

tigerheart57
Feb 06, 2008, 02:09 AM
Hi there everyone,
I am new to this forum. I was recommanded to this forum to study the exercises for the body the proper way. Plus I am a martial Artiest. I came across this thread.

Well, I do Shotokan Karate as my major style. I also enjoy playing with Krav Maga and JJ. I know Shotokan is stand up art but Karav maga or JJ can be a very good supplement for it.

Hisham

nready
Feb 29, 2008, 10:59 PM
Wing Chun - been at it for 5 years, I like the methods related to centerline theory and both defense and attack at the same time. There are a few more basic principles that are very important to me.

Taijiquan - been at it about 20 years, studied Yang first than meet via the Chinese new year in Kansas City meet at Chen teacher we practiced at this church on the Plaza and there I meet a Old woman doing WuHao system. What I learned from Taijiquan is how to read a persons movements via the bridge hand. They all three systems have allot of very advanced ideas of principles.

Pakuaquan - also Baguazang, 20 years of study under the same instructor of Yang Taijiquan. Learned how to throw and attack using a version of clinching. The style of Pakua was Original Form.

Hsinyiquan - Learned it from the same person taught me Yang Taijiquan and Pakua studied it for about 20 years. Learned a more fluid way to constantly attack on the center line based fighting using stepping and everything is combined attacks in Hsingyiquan to me.

Boxing - Did it for some time but mainly do the interval workouts to stay in shape. Can not always find Gym that have boxing partners every where. So it would actually be hard to say how long trained in it did not always have someone to stay on top of it.

The last 2 years been without martial arts practices. Recently after getting up to 260 pounds have looked around for somewhere to train at. Found a BJJ/MMA school thinking seriously attending, instructor Mark Bradford. I have pretty much always used martial arts of some kind to stay in shape, never been in all that many fights. It is kinda like someone said to me that like when you have a dog as a child you often have one later as an adult, same with martial arts.

I do not consider myself a martial artist or a warrior, I do see it as being a player at martial arts though. Meaning I try not to take the martial arts to seriously, meaning at times I have been all I know martial arts I fight you type attitude but now I am a grownup. That being said I have at times wondered why I have kept doing it as an adult, I mean all the martial arts personality is more around the 14 year old kid thing. That is why even though I have taken karate before never liked the be a Japanese not American. The ranking system of Japanese martial arts I don't like it really does not speak to the level of the fighter in the system. I found in Chinese system that is taken out the ranking, you are assessed by how you practice on your own through the eye of the instructor and that allows you to learn more. That is the Chinese system seem to base your learning around how you are practicing on your own, there is no rank given just more knowledge is shared the more you practice and improve.

Later
Mar 02, 2008, 03:35 PM
At the moment I train B.I.F.F Escrima (have trained for five and half months). So far it has been really fun: I love those stick techniques and sparring with rubber knives is so exciting.

Amato
Mar 03, 2008, 05:34 PM
I'm 1º Dan in Krav Maga, and since I've started it i can't think about any other fight. It is simple, fast, useful and improves my reaction time ALLOT!

I did BJJ for a while but didn't liked it much, to much rules, needs a proper floor and cloth, and most of it is on the floor, so it's limited for real life use. So i looked up for a real fight, one with no rules, no special cloth, only pure defense offense techniques based on a fast option to neutralize or in some cases permanently disable the opponent. Then Krav came up, and since i started doing it i can't think on a better fight.

Brand.N.J.
Mar 04, 2008, 06:28 AM
Did 6 years of judo and total of 8 years Jiu Jitsu.
Wanted something more realistic and went to Shooto / Shootfighting.

After a while switched to Krav Maga, doin this 6 hours a week
( 3 days of 2 hours).
I am in the (Royal Netherlands)Marines and this realy is as realistic as combat (or a fight) gets. Im looking in to visiting Protect USA in Jerusalem and train there for a week or so. I currently train with someone that is teaching our special counter terrorism unit. We do a lot of scenario, multiple opponent and stress training/fighting. I realy have to say; this is some good sh*t:D

tonymcclellan
Mar 05, 2008, 12:19 AM
BJJ for six months last year. Now with school and work I am waiting for school to end to start again.

Richmond
Mar 22, 2008, 08:28 PM
I actually got my start in martial arts as a teen in the amateur / Golden Gloves boxing program in the 60s. I started I started Japanese martial arts with shito-ryu karate in 1973. My instructor was a student of Sensei Fumio Demura and in 1976 I graduated college and traveled to CA to train with Demura Sensei. I stayed for about a year, living in the dojo.

I am still with Demura Sensei 34 years later - which says more about his patience than my perserverence. Through him I have had a chance to meet and train with many of the legendary sensei of that generation - Enoeda, Kanazawa, Nishiyama, Mikami, Sato, Iwabuchi and the like.

Demura Sensei was a direct student of Shinken Taira, and we do Ryukyu kobudo in the Taira lineage - bo, ekubo, nunchaku, kama, tonfa, sai. I am a co-owner of our full time dojo.

In sword arts I started Toyama Ryu Batto-Do in 1991 under Demura Sensei and Ueki Sensei, president of the All Japan Batto-Do Federation. Toyama Ryu focuses heavily on use of a live blade in training as well as "proving" your technique through cutting targets. Several years ago, I was accepted into koryu study with Niina Gyosoke of Mugai Ryu. Mugai-Ryu includes training in wakizashi as well as katana. I do not hold rank or a teaching license in Mugai, but have permission to lead a study group of my senior Toyama Ryu students under the supervision of the North American director, "Big Tony" Alvarez of CA.

I teach sword arts a little differently than mainstream martial arts - perhaps more "old school". I limit students to 6. I typically require students to hold dan rank in another art - some drawn from our karate dojo, but I have also had students from aikido, etc. We focus on the sword syllabus - which is plenty, but we also do some cross training twice a week in ju jitsu and escrima with a LEO who is an instructor and long time friend.

I have my own private dojo on my property, so I am able to train daily. I do physical training - bodyweight, dumbells, kettlebells, sledgehammers, as well as hiking with a weight vest - 3X week, escrima/ju jitsu 2X week, JSA class 2X week, karate 2X week, plus some extra training on weekends. Several of my sword students live some distance away and come to stay for the weekend and train. Those weekends, we pretty much train and eat for the whole weekend!

essa
Mar 22, 2008, 09:05 PM
Sweet, how did the Kali silat go mate?
I used to do PD silat for many years before my instructor moved away.
I currently do traditional JJ.
Was very interested in Kali Silat but couldn't find anyone who taught where I lived. Practical martial arts in my country can only really be found in the city areas but not country.

itachi_kisame
Mar 26, 2008, 02:34 AM
currently taking muay thai (modern ring style)
hope to learn muay chaiya

from my experience i've learned that it is better to study and be good at one style first then to just randomly pick different ma in order to become well rounded. when you study your own art very carefully you'll find that they all teach grappling and ground fighting (some may teach it more/less than other styles). you will learn very quickly that some of the techniques that the miltary uses derive from some of these ancient arts. and why not? if you look at all martial arts most if not all were born out of war in order to protect oneself and/or others. I know they didn't have guns back then but, could you not use those same knife/sword disarming techniques for a gun in close quarters?

some other thoughts i have is that you don't need to buy these "real" street fight dvd's because like i said before all their doing anyways is using techniques and methods from other arts anyways, and maybe throwing in some of their own methods. your own art should be sufficient enough for you to stand your ground you just have to constantly practice, practice, practice!

in conclusion no one art is better than the other its all about the practitioner and how hard he/she practices and learning different styles shouldn't just be learned to be well rounded but to make-up for the weaknesses in your art. for ex. muay thai has many excellent leg and elbow techniques but is very weak when it comes to the hands and grappling so you'd probably have to look into boxing and various forms of grappling such as judo, jiu-jitsu, wrestling, etc. lastly you must have confidence in yourself others all you've learned and trained will be in vain.

once you've done the above its all about practice and hard training. anyways hope this helps and made sense

itachi_kisame
Mar 26, 2008, 02:36 AM
if someone understands what i'm trying to say pls. elaborate more for me if needed thanks on advance

tonymcclellan
Mar 29, 2008, 10:13 PM
On Human Weapon they were doing Sambo. That looks pretty cool.

veganjkd
Apr 02, 2008, 08:16 AM
I train Jeet kune do as part of the impact martial arts academy/magda institute association,under which i also train in Filipino kali,indonesian silat and gracie jiu jitsu.:D

judojack
Apr 02, 2008, 12:28 PM
Well, if you are in Tulsa, OK area, Triton Gym has a great BJJ program. Pete Wilhelm is a good instructor. I went there briefly. I wrestled in high school and have been doing Judo on and off since I was 8 and I learned a lot.

They have an awesome gym and he and his wife are great people. The only drawback is that Summer, Pete's wife, can be a tad gruff.

That said, if you are in HS and don't have access to a good MMA gym, I would stick to wrestling and get a heavy bag, a speed bag, and a double end bag.

Be sure to wrap your hands. :cool:

Silumguy
Apr 02, 2008, 04:28 PM
On Human Weapon they were doing Sambo. That looks pretty cool.

Yeah, Sambo looks awesome. I've always wanted to try it. 'Course I don't know how well that would work because I'm not a big guy (160 lbs).

Dave.cyco
Apr 06, 2008, 11:32 PM
I started with Kempo Karate when I was 14, but it was only sport karate. Still it laid the foundation of knowledge in basic kicking and striking techniques.

A few years and much strength and flexibility later, I took a look at Hap Ki Do for a couple weeks, and for all its merit as an exhaustive style which includes very powerful kicking, striking, and trapping/locking/throwing techniques, there was just way too much to learn and it would take years and years of practice to even become proficient, and I just didn't want to make Hap Ki Do my all.

I then moved on to kickboxing at age 26, mostly to test myself with the vigorous conditioning and because (at the time) I wanted to compete. I felt the instructor was second rate. Would you believe he condemned training both orthodox and southpaw stances, saying that he never knew a champion fighter who did both?

My weakness had always been (in my mind) grappling, since I had never done any to speak of, so I joined an informal groop of people practicing Jujutsu, Gracie style. I will be training with them periodically from now on. Probably one month on one month off, since they are a bit pricey to train with, but high quality workouts and small classes.

I don't really believe in styles anymore (to borrow a quote from Bruce Lee). I would rather find an art that focuses on my weak link, train it until I reach a level of competency that I can manage, and then reassess my strengths/weaknesses and start all over. This way I can develop all aspects of my fighting abilities in order to be proficient in all ranges (Shooting, Kicking, Striking, Trapping, Grappling).

I have it in my mind as well to some day take up Kobudo, since to my knowledge Tonfas are not illegal weapons, and they are quite powerful for both offense, and more importantly defense.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQImb5j3eoM&feature=related

One last thing: To make up for the silly pulling your technique habits that were ingrained in me with sport karate I plan to construct and use a makiwara in the very near future.
http://www.karatetips.com/articles/howtomakeamakiwara.asp

Hakon
Apr 13, 2008, 04:48 PM
I train Kung Fu, Taekwondo, Capoeira at a freestyle martial arts school. (We practise most Kung Fu.)

oki27
Apr 18, 2008, 05:15 AM
Hi all,
I learn pencak silat since i was 6 year old. Then i practised taekwondo for 6 years and Kyokushin Karate for 3 years.

Now i train in traditional pencak silat (back to my basic :-) ), because it best suited to me

Phoenician
Apr 18, 2008, 06:50 AM
hey, i started my martial arts training about 3 months ago i'd say, and i was doing an MMA class, my instructor has a background in Goju, muay thai, judo/bjj, i believe he was competitive in all except grappling.

just last week, i tried for the first time a kickboxing/muay thai class, which was pretty good, like a few people have mentioned in here, i found it a little bit overwhelming at times learning all aspects of combat simultaneously, which is why i decided to focus just on striking for the meantime, and keep drilling all the grappling basics that i learned, like sprawling takedown defence, basic positional dominance, and basic submissions.

Tgarber77
Oct 01, 2008, 06:55 PM
I love Martial Arts. I try to train in every style that I can. If I had to pick an absolute favorite it would be difficult... maybe Filipino Kali. Because, all the footwork, hand movements, and stances easily translate to any situation. Be it empty hand, one stick, two sticks, a stick and a knife etc. etc.
:-x:cry::lol:

emaun
Oct 18, 2008, 08:09 PM
lets see.
My first ma is catch wrestling. did it sense i was a kid.
than technical street fighter.
Boxing mix with some Muay Thai.
right now im studying jeet kune do.
I am going to try tai chi because i always wanted to take it.

Journeyman
Oct 19, 2008, 09:01 AM
Yeah, Sambo looks awesome. I've always wanted to try it. 'Course I don't know how well that would work because I'm not a big guy (160 lbs).

Sambo is actually ideal for small guys. It uses leverage techniques like bjj does mixed with meaner stuff. Look at Brett Jacques or Scott Sonnon. Little guys, but champions in Sambo.

Oh and emaun, Tai Chi is wonderful just remember that as a martial art the emphasis is on the 'art' not the 'martial' aspect.

Kanik
Nov 06, 2008, 07:52 PM
Oh and emaun, Tai Chi is wonderful just remember that as a martial art the emphasis is on the 'art' not the 'martial' aspect.

I beg to differ. If you find a good tai chi instructer, than tai chi is the most hardcore, useful martial art I have ever done. Sadly my instructers just seemed to have vanished from the face of the earth :( But yeah, just to stress the point a lil further, I got more out of tai chi, than anything else I have ever done.

Journeyman
Nov 06, 2008, 08:57 PM
Obviously a master in any of the traditional arts would be pretty much undefeatable...

Here is a true master of Tai Chi Chu'an. This is not faked by the way.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XSnUDkCQ0WU

after years of work, this master has become an expert at swiftly finding and dxploiting his opponents' center of gravity.

EvilOne
Nov 07, 2008, 01:50 AM
:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes: :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

footsouljah
Nov 07, 2008, 04:00 AM
hey guys,
ive been doing kyokushin karate for 11 years now, also a bit of kickboxing for 2-3 years and boxing the past year to help with speed and what not.
My fighting, probably due to the kyokushin, is very much centred around my legs, keeping balanced and stemming all power from my strikes from the ground up. I'm an average height, so ive learnt to really come in close

knuckledragger74
Nov 07, 2008, 12:05 PM
I have been training "mma" for lack of a better word. My instructor is very accomplished in brazillian jiu-jitsu , Tang-so-doo, savate, western boxing and kickboxing.We are a small school . we train gi on in the winter month's and pants and rashguard in summer it is more traditional oriented than sport oriented. I love it . One of our guys just got back from Bita Lima's school in Brazil.

Ashiro
Nov 08, 2008, 08:57 PM
Ju Jutsu.

Japanese - not BJJ.

USMC machine
Nov 09, 2008, 06:13 PM
Obviously a master in any of the traditional arts would be pretty much undefeatable...

Here is a true master of Tai Chi Chu'an. This is not faked by the way.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XSnUDkCQ0WU

after years of work, this master has become an expert at swiftly finding and dxploiting his opponents' center of gravity.


:neutral:

Dragonball Z isn't fake either.

EvilOne
Nov 09, 2008, 06:24 PM
I like to keep my mouth shut, and suprise kick in the biscut:p:p:p

Journeyman
Nov 09, 2008, 09:43 PM
OK, that vid isn't something fantastical, although it does require a great deal of skill. Imagine fighting someone who's trying to balance on one leg, or on a tightrope. You can push them over pretty easily right? And everything they do will be slow, etc.

If you can find someone's center of gravity easily, then it is much the same. Keep in mind that the guy in the vid is someone with transcendent skills, there are only a handful of people on the planet who can do that, even after a lifetime of training. Obviously many will still doubt it, but oh well.

SpartanKimura
Nov 12, 2008, 12:36 AM
Muay Thai, BJJ and Wrestling.

KVD990
Nov 18, 2008, 02:57 PM
Ive been doing Uechi-Ryu Karate for almost 2 years and HS wrestling for soon to be 2 seasons. I love martial arts :)

Dianu
Dec 03, 2008, 04:55 AM
I love Kung Fu (especially Shoalin and the Southern arts) so Wing Chun was right up my street! Been training now for about 6Months, so still a beginner, but it's an Art that's always teaching you something.

lycan
Dec 05, 2008, 12:14 AM
i practice Sin Moo Hapkido, is very good for self defense

Dominator350
Dec 05, 2008, 12:35 AM
...crowbar

EvilOne
Dec 05, 2008, 01:06 AM
Take off my coat throw it over your head, split chew spit in yer eye, punch you with a salt shaker or beer mug in my hand, pour hot sauce on my fingers and shove then in your eyes. Throw a drink on ya and kick you in the biscutt. Then unleash the jack hammer . And I am a nice guy. There are alot of a-holes out there who are alot dirtier than I.

EvilOne
Dec 05, 2008, 01:11 AM
Wrestling grappling mma and some ma's are good. But here we go here is my can of worms. Most m/a practitioners wouldn't stand a chance in alot of scenarios .

Dominator350
Dec 05, 2008, 01:25 AM
he tried to keel me... so now, I gotta return him da favour....

EvilOne
Dec 05, 2008, 01:26 AM
he tried to keel me... so now, I gotta return him da favour....
Take his own knife and stab him in the liver BANG BANG BANG WHUP LIKE THIS KICK IN THE GROIN BONG BONG BONG DANGA DA DANG DADNAG BING BONG

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D3K-mrlYG7Y

Fatman
Dec 05, 2008, 02:42 AM
This thread is definitely changing for the better :)

Dianu
Dec 05, 2008, 06:44 AM
XD Bang Bang Bang Bong, Dang-a-Da Dang-a-Da!! Epic FX from Mr. Rutten!!

And most important, "Never EVER let him take that choke.. because when you're out, God knows what they'll do to you???" ;)

Madhatter
Dec 07, 2008, 12:22 PM
I practice Muay Thai, boxing and mma with the occasinal bjj or catch wrestling class. I also wrestled in high school which helps me keep it on the feet.

Dianu
Dec 08, 2008, 06:00 AM
Interesting fact for you, Catch Wrestling originated from over here in little old Lancashire, England. Originally called Lancashire Wrestling, it was around during the time of trhe Roman occupation of England (then called Albion) and was considered to be a rough and un-civil version of the already popular Greco-Roman wrestling!

Kanik
Dec 13, 2008, 08:03 PM
Interesting fact for you, Catch Wrestling originated from over here in little old Lancashire, England. Originally called Lancashire Wrestling, it was around during the time of trhe Roman occupation of England (then called Albion) and was considered to be a rough and un-civil version of the already popular Greco-Roman wrestling!

I always wanted to do catch wrestling... But that IS an interesting peice of information.

Dianu
Dec 14, 2008, 10:15 AM
Thanks Kanik!
Being from Lancasire myself, I somehow feel I ought to have actually done my County's sport, but sadly I never have and so can't reccommend it or otherwise... You should try and find a school though, it could be interesting!

Madhatter
Dec 15, 2008, 10:52 AM
Interesting fact, thanks. Catch also has a history in american carnival wrestling and is a viable alternative to BJJ for your ground game.
The big difference between BJJ and catch is that in BJJ there is a focus on improving your position, while in Catch your more focused on taking any sub possible. The metaphor I'd put forward would be the difference between a positional chess player and a tactical chess player.

frankenskid
Dec 15, 2008, 02:48 PM
I am currently taking judo, and have for about 3 months, I took tai chi for about 3 months a few years ago, and I took kempo for about 6 months, also a few years ago. I am sticking with judo, and looking to get into Jiu Jitsu at a local club, but man are they pricey 120$ a month, and 3 seesions a week, so it's like 10$ a class whether I go or not.

Madhatter
Dec 15, 2008, 09:10 PM
That does seem a bit pricey, is submission wrestling all that your interested in?

Madhatter
Dec 15, 2008, 09:49 PM
First I'd like to say that I agree with you for the most part, it's not the style that makes the fighter but the fighter himself. That said most arts have cerain weakness and it only makes since to fill in those gaps. BJJ's stand up leaves something to be desired at the same time Muay Thai's ground game is nonexistent, it only makes sense to combine the to or some alternative of them and that is exactly what most mma gyms do. As far as Muay Thai goes hand work is a integral part of the style.

frankenskid
Dec 16, 2008, 08:22 AM
Well not so much submission wrestling, as I really would like something that has some of the more real world applications. And it has been my experience, that any fight you have to worry about winning eventually goes to the ground. If you can stand up and beat the crap out of someone, then you don't really have to worry. I am actually looking into krav maga. but I am not sure how dedicated I can be with the studio/Dojo being almost 40 minutes from my house back home.

Madhatter
Dec 16, 2008, 01:59 PM
Any style that spends alot of time sparring is going to be effective on the street. Boxing, muay thai, bjj, catch, sambo, mma etc.

Dianu
Dec 16, 2008, 02:56 PM
My personal opinion.. Submission wrestling (Such as BJJ) is not real-world applicable. The one place you never go during a fight on the street, in a bar or anywhere like that is on the ground. Yes, it's curently very popular in Sport-entertainment, but that's a whole world from a real fight.

Firstly, in sports-entertainment like UFC, Pride, K1 etc. they've got to have some rules, you can't start doing eye-pokes, bites etc. and obviously, because they don't want all their fighters getting serious abrasions or life-threatening trauma in every fight, the floors are padded and spring loaded so as to prevent heavy impact and serious cuts. I imagine wrestling on tarmac or broken glass is NOT NEARLY as comfortable.

More importantly however, in real life people won't often start a fight solo, neither will they start a fight in a secluded area. They'll either attack you alone and with a weapon or, more commonly, attack you with a group of friends. It only takes one kick to the head for you to end up in hospital or worse. In-fact even if somebody does start a fight alone, it's a good bet that some drunken d**k will decide to kick your head in anyway, just for the hell of it.

The advantage of the standing game is that you can move about quickly, avoid getting swarmed and set up each opponent one by one, without become an open target.

Of course, this isn't even STARTING to touch on other issue, such as the fact that they might be carrying a concealed weapon etc. etc.
I know I may seem like i'm stressing the point a little, but if your aim is real-world application then wrestling and submission has so little going for it and so much going against it. My advice is to learn Kick-boxing or Thai Boxing. Dispite popular belief that "Street-fighters" are some hardened elite with un-stoppable sucker punches and dirty play, in truth most can't even punch properly and rely on fear tactics. Both of those arts will give you, against the average person, a massive advantage after only a few months training.

If you feel like committing more time and effort, then perhaps try something more technical (Wing Chun perhaps, but there's a LOT of bollocks Wing Chun teachers out there. Maybe an Animal style, like Tiger or Crane?)

Good luck in your Martial Arts journey! ;)

Madhatter
Dec 17, 2008, 11:53 AM
I prefer stand up personally, but I have to disagree about ground fighting. In a one on one fight a good knowledge of wrestling/ grappling will allow you to control the fight with much less chance of taking damage and also lets you to decide how much damage to inflict.
The point about not wanting to go to the ground against multiple opponents holds true, but unless your Chuck Norris your going to take a beating regardless. Your best chance would be to get away.

Dianu
Dec 17, 2008, 12:55 PM
You might take a beating, but it doesn't mean you're gonna loose if you don't run, i'm sure we've all seen the Youtube Videos where two or more opponents get taken on. Plus, running might not be so easy, I'm sure you could imagine a situation where running wouldn't be an option, at least immidiatly.

I see your point of course, against a single opponent a good grappler has, without doubt, the advantage of greater control. It's just I personally feel that a) single opponents are rare these days and b) a hidden weapon is much more dangrous in clinch/grapple range.

Anybody train any multiple opponent style? Have any tactics?

samuraibill
Dec 21, 2008, 08:57 AM
I am judo, jujitsu, and aikido guy. since no martial art is perfect, I study a several. I have been off the mat a while due to school, but that's going to change soon.

htoval
Dec 21, 2008, 10:45 AM
I practice Sei Ryoku Zen Yo Karate-kobudo and used to practice Moo Duk Kwan (red belt). I plan later to also learn Jiu-jitsu to be a complete fighter.

EvilOne
Dec 22, 2008, 01:59 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PKmUsVeKp1o&NR=1

Journeyman
Dec 22, 2008, 03:25 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PKmUsVeKp1o&NR=1

That's you there on the left right?

EvilOne
Dec 22, 2008, 04:32 PM
That's you there on the left right?
Yep more like was me, before I took the course!

Fatman
Dec 23, 2008, 05:57 AM
Is that from Napoleon Dynamite? Awesome flick!

fotakou
Dec 23, 2008, 12:45 PM
I am a practitioner of capoeira,a combination of ma and acrobatics.when i was young i was doing tae kwon do but seriously i think capoeira was my best choice ever :D

Dave.cyco
Dec 23, 2008, 12:46 PM
How long have you been doing capoeira?

fotakou
Dec 23, 2008, 12:55 PM
For around 2.5 years.The first 6 months were not that good since my teacher was not into the mood for teaching and was always doing basic movements.But around the fall of 2007 i changed teachers and by now i have been able to see a lot of improvement in movements and acrobatics in general :D

Dave.cyco
Dec 23, 2008, 05:26 PM
Do you feel it has the same practical applicability as TKD? Do you feel confident about self defense, or is that something not stressed? Just curious I don't know much about it (other than it's very very flashy).

fotakou
Dec 23, 2008, 06:04 PM
No bro,if you are looking for self defense capoeira is not your choice.Surely you will learn how to throw some kicks and you will learn how to evade some movements but when it comes to a real fight you need to have resilience to pain,something that we do not train.There are some groups that teach fighting capoeira.In short they take a lot of elements from other ma's and try to blend them together,resulting in an aweful thing...Capoeira if for fun,making friends,getting in shape and learning cool moves.Its not gonna save your ass unless your oponent is a dork :lol:

Dave.cyco
Dec 23, 2008, 06:26 PM
I always guessed as much, but what do I know? I never trained in it. Thanks for your perspective.:)

Bissen
Dec 24, 2008, 04:15 PM
Karate. Been doing it for well about a year now.

Whippem
Jan 09, 2009, 10:53 AM
I studied a derivative of Ed Parker Kenpo and kickboxing back in the eighties. Got my First Degree Black Belt and was an instructor.

It was okay, but I noticed so many things missing from the whole karate/martial arts thing that I haven't studied since then, just perfected my own system.

I found that what is taught and how it is taught is unrealistic for real self-defense. Punches are pulled and the knowledge of really how to eliminate an attacker is not stressed at all. It gave me the notion that karate instructors don't really know how to do it, yet hide behind the "it's too dangerous to teach" bs.

It's a fear of violence.

So if we aren't really taught how to take out the bad guy, then what's the point?

After all, you may think it's a religion, but it's not.

All it's about is taking out the bad guy, elminating a threat.

If you think it's an "art" then call it martial ballet, or martial dancing.

stevenl
Jan 09, 2009, 10:55 AM
Unless you are fighting someone who won't let you take them down. ex. Chuck L.

Yeah, then you could just knock Chuck LITTLE on his old ass.

stevenl
Jan 09, 2009, 10:57 AM
I practice Jiu Jitsu and some boxing. I have wrestled and tried karate as well. I don't go to a dojo, per se. I go to a friend's house. He is a black belt in Jiu Jitsu and he shows me practical applications for martial arts on the streets so that I can defend myself.

Dougaderly
Jan 11, 2009, 06:30 AM
I do Hung Gar Kung Fu. There is a teacher from Wing Lam's school out here that teaches in his house. Mostly we've been about 50 - 50 forms to drills. I've been having a great time at it for about a year now.

gilstrap
Jan 11, 2009, 07:00 AM
I am a practitioner of capoeira,a combination of ma and acrobatics.when i was young i was doing tae kwon do but seriously i think capoeira was my best choice ever :D

ive never heard of caporia , i did a lot of judo when i younger and still have spells where i get into and go regular but its becoming hard to justify the subs to my wife and will probably wind it down this year ( IM GOING OF POINT)
but is it just for keep fit or are there practical aspects to capoeira as it sounds like something youd see at the circus,

Hayden6-6
Jan 11, 2009, 08:43 AM
:twisted:not like most of these types that talk talk talk, (type, type,type)... Muay thai and MMA has been constantly on my mind for 20 years now. I am in the US army, and I train on a daily basis! everyday, PT, Lunchtime, afterwards... circut training that consists mostly of BWE, I use a heavybag, pullup bar/dip bar, kettle bells and dumbells. Muay thai has been part of my life for a loong time! in conjunction with BJJ in the form of the Modern Army Combatives Program of which I instruct. Training for physical combat has become a large portion of my life over the last handful of years... and that is fine with me!:twisted:

The more flashy gaudy, "forms" if you invest all of yourself into it you MIGHT become a good fighter...after 10 years maby...all of "Kung FU" is useful, if you take what you "NEED" from it, disgard what is useless, it all has a singular purpose... some make you look like a ballerina, it looks good on stage though! ;)
FIGHTINGISNOTACRIME

Starting Over
Jan 11, 2009, 03:38 PM
Well i have never taken a formal class, but i used to run around in cali, philipins, been to brizil, well about 30 dif countries. Ive fought in more bars and streets than i can remember, ive been shot, stabed, clubed, hit with beer bottles, mugs, bricks, bats and anything els that was around, and i have returned the favor with the same stuff whenever possable.

My personal opinion is that MMA looks awsome on tv but in a real life bar or street fight where it is live or die most of them would, dare i say die. 95% of the time your attacker isnt alone, hes in a pack. When you got 3 or more people trying to hurt or kill you there is no time for special moves and you NEVER, EVER want to go to the ground, if you do your DEAD. You have to take people out fast and put them out of the fight permantly!

That being said, im a big fan of the make them bow down to you solution. Simply put the first attacker to reach you......Kick his knee cap with all the force you can muster, man cant stand man cant fight, at least not in a street fight. Bonus is his pack sees him and might stop for a second and give you a chance to run, or at least find a wepon of some sort. In real life situations you must take confrontation seriously or you will be taken off guard and hurt or worse killed, plain and simple do what you have to do to elimanate the threat to you.

My dad told me to never fight to win, because if your in a fight then winning is a mood point. When in a fight, fight to hurt, because if the other person didnt want to hurt you then there wouldnt be a fight.

On the leagal side of it( at least here in the usa) you can do what is neccasary to defend you and your property but once the threat is over then you cant take it any further. ie.... the shattered knee cap, if he cant attack me then he is not a threat to me any more so i leagaly cant hurt him any more, unless he pulls a weapon, knife, gun, or what have you.

Real fighting is all about defending your self by causing as much hurt as you can untill your able to get out of the situation. Plain and simple. It took me years and manny knife scars and 3 bullets in my body along with 3 monthes of being paralized from the waist down to figure this out.

No matter what you practice or how good you are at it, in a street fight situation it is best to run away from it and when you cant dont fight to win, fight to hurt till you can run!

crashnburn
Jan 13, 2009, 01:38 PM
I have been training in and teaching aikido, for a number of years

i also train in muay thai and jogo de pau (stick fighting)

in the past i have trained in

wing chun
shantung black tiger KF
western boxing
shotokan karate
some ju jutsu

also some judo and fencing when i was at school


My background is in Muay Thai & Wing Chun.

Thinking of having a go at Bujinkan Taijutsu too.

One of my closest friends has been studying Aikido for about 10 years. I can eat him alive at kickboxing and trapping range but once the grappling begins he ties me up like a pretzel :oops:


I started in Shaolin Kung-Fu at 7. Have studied Tae kwoon Do, taijutsu, and JKD(More a personal journey). Learned wrestling from my uncle(State Champ in Highschool) and dad. Both of which did alot of streetfighting in there day, and taught me how to fight. Also exchanged techniques with my Aikido friend, a Kempo guy, and a MMA friend. And been in Capeoira the longest, or rather have lived Capeoira the longest.


I train in wado-ryu karate since I was 13 (21 now), and I love it. It incorporates a lot of jujitsu techniques as well as some very aikido-like movements. It puts a lot of emphasis on being soft, but we still do semi and full contact sparring with grappling allowed. :smile: I also started capoeira about two years ago, and I love it. Plus contrary to popular belief, it has some very good techniques for actual fighting :smile:


Have you ever heard of Catch wrestiling? It is an awsome form of submision wrestiling that is wrestiling based. all the fundementals of wrestiling apply. why start to learn BJJ, and have to re-learn or apply other principals to your training of summissions. check it out online and think about it.


Yes! Catch wrestling, real good stuff. I found a lot of it real easy to learn and understand .


Studied JKD concepts for 10 years, MMA concepts 3 yrs, European Fencing per Fabris style, SPEAR system (informally) 2 yrs.

All fun stuff.


Black Belts: Moh Kempo (found only in Canada, eh), Shaolin Kenpo
Brown Belt: Alambra style Arnis de Mano

Dabbled in: Aikido, kung fu, Woo Gar Mo Sut, police & RCMP hand-to-hand

Studied by way of book: military hand to hand combat (modern & WWII), chin-na (chinese joint locking), san-shou (Chinese throwing technique), juijutsu, judo, kenjutsu, boxing, wrestling, various esoteric forms of kung fu, Western rapier, broadsword and smallsword technique,

And the reason for studying all that was that I spent 10 years studying and directing stage combat, including: single sword broadsword, smallsword, rapier & dagger, rapier & companion, martial arts, unarmed combat, spears, knives, sticks, chairs, clothes, found weapons, and anything else we could think of and/or try.

One of my favorite fights I designed followed the stage direction "they fight by the ears a while." Now that was fun! :)


I did TKD as a kid.
I did about 3 1/2 years of a shaolin family style that incoporated a fair amount of ground fighting.
4-ish months of an internal/soft applications style called Fook Yueng Chuan.
1 month of private lessons in Sun Family style taijiquan.

After the holidays I plan to start Wing Chun... which I've wanted to do for years. Don't know why I never did.


yea i agree with erik taking someone to the ground might be good in the UFC but best to be avoided on the street, still should kno it tho just incase you cant avoid it. the MA's i take are ninjutsu (with aliveness), jujutsu, sambo, muay thai, a little boxing, and a little san shao (chinese boxing), and ill be starting judo in the spring semester as a college course so that pretty sweet. one of my life gaols is trying a little bit of everything and take what works


I started martial training with jun fan kung fu (I think thats spelled right), which I did for about 6 months. I then did northern shaolin for about 2 years. Finally, I have been studying Tai chi for about a year now (mostly yang style, but I have learned a few movements in chen and sun style, the more martial versions of tai chi). I also learned very small amounts of kali, judo, and western boxing.


I box a little at a local gym and I practice Judo at the local university. My instructor is also a level 2 US Army combatives instructor.

I have studied JKD, Kempo, Kali, Krav, Kyokusin, GoJu, TKD, Savate, MT, and wing chun. However, of that laundry list I only practice a few Krav moves, Savate kicks, and I work a few Kali drills.

I've tasted a little of everything, but my stomach is far from full.


I'm 1º Dan in Krav Maga, and since I've started it i can't think about any other fight. It is simple, fast, useful and improves my reaction time ALLOT!

I did BJJ for a while but didn't liked it much, to much rules, needs a proper floor and cloth, and most of it is on the floor, so it's limited for real life use. So i looked up for a real fight, one with no rules, no special cloth, only pure defense offense techniques based on a fast option to neutralize or in some cases permanently disable the opponent. Then Krav came up, and since i started doing it i can't think on a better fight.


Did 6 years of judo and total of 8 years Jiu Jitsu.
Wanted something more realistic and went to Shooto / Shootfighting.

After a while switched to Krav Maga, doin this 6 hours a week
( 3 days of 2 hours).
I am in the (Royal Netherlands)Marines and this realy is as realistic as combat (or a fight) gets. Im looking in to visiting Protect USA in Jerusalem and train there for a week or so. I currently train with someone that is teaching our special counter terrorism unit. We do a lot of scenario, multiple opponent and stress training/fighting. I realy have to say; this is some good sh*t:D


hey, i started my martial arts training about 3 months ago i'd say, and i was doing an MMA class, my instructor has a background in Goju, muay thai, judo/bjj, i believe he was competitive in all except grappling.

just last week, i tried for the first time a kickboxing/muay thai class, which was pretty good, like a few people have mentioned in here, i found it a little bit overwhelming at times learning all aspects of combat simultaneously, which is why i decided to focus just on striking for the meantime, and keep drilling all the grappling basics that i learned, like sprawling takedown defence, basic positional dominance, and basic submissions.


lets see.
My first ma is catch wrestling. did it sense i was a kid.
than technical street fighter.
Boxing mix with some Muay Thai.
right now im studying jeet kune do.
I am going to try tai chi because i always wanted to take it.


OK, that vid isn't something fantastical, although it does require a great deal of skill. Imagine fighting someone who's trying to balance on one leg, or on a tightrope. You can push them over pretty easily right? And everything they do will be slow, etc.

If you can find someone's center of gravity easily, then it is much the same. Keep in mind that the guy in the vid is someone with transcendent skills, there are only a handful of people on the planet who can do that, even after a lifetime of training. Obviously many will still doubt it, but oh well.


My personal opinion.. Submission wrestling (Such as BJJ) is not real-world applicable. The one place you never go during a fight on the street, in a bar or anywhere like that is on the ground. Yes, it's curently very popular in Sport-entertainment, but that's a whole world from a real fight.

Firstly, in sports-entertainment like UFC, Pride, K1 etc. they've got to have some rules, you can't start doing eye-pokes, bites etc. and obviously, because they don't want all their fighters getting serious abrasions or life-threatening trauma in every fight, the floors are padded and spring loaded so as to prevent heavy impact and serious cuts. I imagine wrestling on tarmac or broken glass is NOT NEARLY as comfortable.

More importantly however, in real life people won't often start a fight solo, neither will they start a fight in a secluded area. They'll either attack you alone and with a weapon or, more commonly, attack you with a group of friends. It only takes one kick to the head for you to end up in hospital or worse. In-fact even if somebody does start a fight alone, it's a good bet that some drunken d**k will decide to kick your head in anyway, just for the hell of it.

The advantage of the standing game is that you can move about quickly, avoid getting swarmed and set up each opponent one by one, without become an open target.

Of course, this isn't even STARTING to touch on other issue, such as the fact that they might be carrying a concealed weapon etc. etc.
I know I may seem like i'm stressing the point a little, but if your aim is real-world application then wrestling and submission has so little going for it and so much going against it. My advice is to learn Kick-boxing or Thai Boxing. Dispite popular belief that "Street-fighters" are some hardened elite with un-stoppable sucker punches and dirty play, in truth most can't even punch properly and rely on fear tactics. Both of those arts will give you, against the average person, a massive advantage after only a few months training.

If you feel like committing more time and effort, then perhaps try something more technical (Wing Chun perhaps, but there's a LOT of bollocks Wing Chun teachers out there. Maybe an Animal style, like Tiger or Crane?)

Good luck in your Martial Arts journey! ;)

So what would you recommend for the following things in the short term (quicker results, learning, effectivity):

- Good Fat loss / Cardio / Burn / Overall Fitness? (e.g. A Capoeira)
- Functional Fitness / Functional Strength
- Conditioning?
- Strong Core?
- Best Defense Attack with a Short Learning Curve for Real life situation? (I hear Krav Maga is effective from that angle)

Dave.cyco
Jan 13, 2009, 01:42 PM
B o x i n g .

gilstrap
Jan 13, 2009, 01:42 PM
i dont know about the rest but as for defense and attack , well i was always
told you cant put muscle on balls or chins

CDavidNeely
Jan 14, 2009, 06:57 AM
Greetings,

I have a nidan(second black) in shotokan and a shodan(first black) in Hakko Ryu Jiu Jitsu. These are my primaries but I have others (a brown belt in Kobudo). A way long time ago (1986-1987)I took several training camps with Stephen Hayes (Bujinkan). Since that time I have taken a much more eclectic approach to my martial arts. Do to the influence of Bujinkan thinking I take a tools approach to weapons practice but I incorporate escrima, espada y daga, Yagyu Shinkage, combat pistolcraft and pretty anything that I find adds to my skills.

In addition, I am an avid survivalist (which I do consider to be a martial art) and a student of parkour (without the extreme tricking that messes up the basic idea).

David

Fatman
Jan 14, 2009, 09:19 AM
i dont know about the rest but as for defense and attack , well i was always
told you cant put muscle on balls or chins

Ah, grasshopper, I take it you haven't been trained in the ways of the Iron Crotch?

Ironmunki
Jan 14, 2009, 09:36 AM
My background is kung fu. I've studied Tien Shan Pei northern kung fu for 14 years. I also trained capoeira for about 5 years and some groundfighting. I just recently switched to a school that teaches brazilian jiu-jitsu, muay thai and MMA. A lot of great fighters, professional and amatuers, train there and the workouts are really intense. Loving it.

gilstrap
Jan 14, 2009, 12:40 PM
Greetings,

I have a nidan(second black) in shotokan and a shodan(first black) in Hakko Ryu Jiu Jitsu. These are my primaries but I have others (a brown belt in Kobudo). A way long time ago (1986-1987)I took several training camps with Stephen Hayes (Bujinkan). Since that time I have taken a much more eclectic approach to my martial arts. Do to the influence of Bujinkan thinking I take a tools approach to weapons practice but I incorporate escrima, espada y daga, Yagyu Shinkage, combat pistolcraft and pretty anything that I find adds to my skills.

In addition, I am an avid survivalist (which I do consider to be a martial art) and a student of parkour (without the extreme tricking that messes up the basic idea).

David
is time relative to space or space relavant to age ...........does being good at pool count

bodylifter
Mar 21, 2009, 05:59 PM
I have studied numerous styles over the years but I keep coming back to one thing that Bruce Lee said "Use whatever works"

abenshea
Apr 02, 2009, 08:31 PM
I think is a lot of merit in what "Starting Over" passed along. That being said, I am a black belt in BJJ and have a background in wrestling, Judo, and boxing. So, I would be happy to help you with choosing a good school or training program.

Letlev
Apr 11, 2009, 03:59 AM
I haven't done any MA before the beginning of this year.

January first I signed up at a Filipino Martial arts school run by P.G. Hufana, so far I'm loving the classes and I'm going to a spring camp next weekend(11+ hours of training).

I hope to see an increase in skill level after it since the last seminar (7 hours) helped me out a lot since I'm still really new to this.

pasychosheep
Apr 12, 2009, 11:46 PM
I'm a shodan in isshinryu karate(going for my nidan this summer), as well as a green belt in judo. I've also dabbled in a bit of kung fu, and I'm beginning to learn tai chi, tai chi sword, and qi gong.

EvilOne
Apr 12, 2009, 11:57 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vjr41NpabQ0&NR=1

Dominator350
Apr 13, 2009, 12:04 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyBL_x86mQ8&feature=PlayList&p=8E36EA10292D5233&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=8

EvilOne
Apr 13, 2009, 12:22 AM
Hey that was my video from then best ma in a street fight thread!!! you stoled it!! Now I am gonna have to bing bang bong your ass!!

Dominator350
Apr 13, 2009, 09:33 AM
Hey that was my video from then best ma in a street fight thread!!! you stoled it!! Now I am gonna have to bing bang bong your ass!!


OK I'm very sorry "BANG" no I'm not...

EvilOne
Apr 13, 2009, 11:01 AM
OK I'm very sorry "BANG" no I'm not...
ya got me:-x

bill miller
Apr 18, 2009, 02:48 AM
The greatest martial artsist I have ever had the honor to meet, Sigung Isidro Archibeque, told me he hated fighting boxers and wrestlers because they have such a high pain tolerance. He also said if you practice and become proficient in these two sports, you'll be able to kick the crap out 99% of your opponents, "martial artists" included.

koganinja
Apr 18, 2009, 04:30 AM
ive done ninjitsu my whole life about 23 years now plus use to be in the army so use to teach a few bits there to

EvilOne
May 07, 2009, 09:25 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7P1l0FoX6e0

rickvv
May 08, 2009, 08:16 AM
That's funny.

bill miller
May 08, 2009, 10:20 PM
That IS funny.

marticus
May 10, 2009, 06:19 PM
Hi I did Judo for a while in my youth but dropped out of that by the time i went to secondary school (highschool for you yanks;-)).
I have been training mixed martial arts for the last year which is great the classes are more self defense based rather than sport. (no ufc for me :D)
today i took my first BJJ class which i can easily say was the best workout i have had in years! by the end i thought i was gonna be sick i was that tired. i will not hesitate to recommend it to anyone looking for a good all round/cardio workout. two hours of that and i am still feeling fucked 3 hours later. with that in mind i am now going to sleep and try to regain some energy for mma tommorrow!

Freeman
Jun 13, 2009, 12:58 PM
Mainly Isshinryu and a little BJJ. But I folllow the original Isshinryu philosophy and study everything I can, and practice what I find that works.

gilstrap
Jun 13, 2009, 01:31 PM
now im not having a pop ...but what the fucks isshhinu ( cant even fucking spell it ) are you guys on this thread making some of these fucking names up ...when i was young it was judo or karate take your pick ...i mean whos teaching this shit where you live ...ive never heard of it and ive watched every episode of the texas ranger ,,,,,

rimam1
Jun 15, 2009, 10:45 AM
i've done Wing Chun and I think it's one of the most effective arts. You should add some brazilian ju jitsu to the mix if you want to be a really well rounded fighter... but unless you wnt to compete, who really has time for all of that?

For basic street defense, wing chun is great...

Braka
Jun 18, 2009, 04:10 AM
11 years of Martial Arts experience here! Practicing Eskrima at the moment! very effective! :p

Nicodemus
Jun 21, 2009, 02:59 AM
BJJ, submission wrestling, Muay Thai and Balintawak Kali.

gilstrap
Jun 21, 2009, 04:57 AM
BJJ, submission wrestling, Muay Thai and Balintawak Kali.


your doing all of these last time i looked there where only 7 days in a week

Nicodemus
Jun 21, 2009, 09:25 AM
your doing all of these last time i looked there where only 7 days in a week

I'm only training 6 days a week. Mon, Wed, Fri are for BJJ. Tue, Thu, Sat are for Submission and MT or Kali. Bodyweight training in the morning. Sundays I just take it easy, no big deal eh?

draego
Jun 21, 2009, 02:45 PM
I take karate, Shotokai
for about two and a half years
and Kobudo on and off for maybe a year
I'm going to test next month for green belt in Karate
one more after that and it'll be brown
I'd like to take BJJ
Shotokai is awsome at taking someone down to the mat but I haven't the foggiest idea what to do once you get your opponent down there besides just hitting them or going for an armbar

TheMasterKey
Jun 21, 2009, 03:28 PM
I'm only training 6 days a week. Mon, Wed, Fri are for BJJ. Tue, Thu, Sat are for Submission and MT or Kali. Bodyweight training in the morning. Sundays I just take it easy, no big deal eh?

Is all this taught at one place?

Freeman
Jun 23, 2009, 02:56 PM
Why r u always so disrespectful?

It's widely thought of and trained as karate, and just not quite as popular in the U.S. as Judo and Tae Kwon Do, except it's not a competition focused art, it's more of a, kill them when they try to kill you art.

Google/Yahoo it.

n8tive
Jun 23, 2009, 03:20 PM
Why r u always so disrespectful?

Who are you talking to??

Bruiser
Jun 23, 2009, 03:51 PM
I've studied a few martial arts - Judo, Kung Fu, TKD - and right now I am studying Systema. It's a Russian Martial Art and I feel as though finally I have found the perfect system for me. I would say for everyone maybe but that would be way too pretentious of me.

For any of you out there who are going to search it on youtube, I will already warn that many of those videos are complete BS just as with any martial art, you will always find the cons. Search Mickhail Ryabko - his stuff is good.

The funny part about this martial art is that when you are just looking from the outside, it seems too soft and gentle (most of the time) to really be effective... and then you give it a go and you FEEL the efficiency :-D

vostok
Jun 24, 2009, 04:03 AM
Boxing, BJJ and Army Combatives Skill Level 1 and 2 trainer courses. I've recently started training in Krav Maga as well.

gilstrap
Jun 24, 2009, 04:43 AM
Who are you talking to??

me again.....somepeople ...need a blackbelt in humour...a mean cmon considering your doin all these martial arts ..i figured you may be a bit more resiliant to a bit of banter ....im just trying to add something different to the thread...i know jackshit compared to some of the guys on the site so theres no point in me trying to top what they say ...i just add my little piece of britan to the thread

EvilOne
Jun 24, 2009, 10:30 AM
Your right only 7 days in a week. Must be a kid, and have zero real responsibilities. No offense if your situation is different. But that is like a job! Keep it up.

Freeman
Jun 24, 2009, 02:39 PM
You don't need 7 days a week to train in EVERYTHING. I only average out 45 minutes or so a day, some days I don't train at all, some days, if I don't have anything I want or have to do, most all day.

Isshinryu karate is the only specific style I practice, it is a philosphy more than a style, like Jeet Kune Do, In fact, Master Tatsuo Shimabuku "prieched" (sp?) the same idea of martial arts about 50 years before Bruce Lee. It's not like you can practice anything anyway. I'm meaning that anything I hear, see or think of that works, I find time to try it, if it does seem to work, I practice it. We go by concepts and philosphies, a 2nd natured understanding, more so than specific techniques, so it takes much less time to practice a lot more. Generally a kickboxing style or tae kwon do would get the same amount of practice doing their own things in about 5x the amount of time.

you

DRS
Jun 24, 2009, 08:43 PM
Bruiser, Thanks for saying something about Systema. I am thinking about ordering the dvd's and and had some questions about this MA such as,

Does it have boxing type strikes and defenses or is it more opened handed striking?

Is it's ground fighting more street or ring oriented?

Do it's weapon disarming moves make you grab the gun ( this can be dangerous).

Does it use UFC type grappling for close range.

Does it resemble WW2 combat ( I heard it did).

How does it compare to Guided Chaos (Attack proof). Guided Chaos is a "soft" art that teaches improvisation over technique through drills and "contact flow," their version of sparring. If anyone has any info on Systema, please let me know.

Bruiser
Jun 25, 2009, 12:15 AM
Hi DRS,

The best way to answer al of your questions is to say that the only rule is "what works".
Each person has a different way of moving that comes to them naturally, so there are no pre-set ways of moving. You learn to fully relax the body and to use what comes naturally to you but by using your body in a smarter way (since most of us are "blocked" beyond imagination). In our class, the motto is "Be aware of your self".

I hope that answers your questions. Feel free to contact me if you have anything else.

Nicodemus
Jun 25, 2009, 04:17 AM
BBJ, submission and MT at one and same place. And they call submission just BJJ with no-gi. Kali I'm learning from a friend of mine who also happens to coach MT. I don't train all every week, some weeks just BJJ and BJJ with no-gi/submission wrestling. I hold a part-time job in a software company currently so I get time to recover. I ride a bike to the BJJ gym 10km and back, the days I'm not working. With a full-time job I'd overdrive my self in a week most probably.
If professional fighters are not included, most people training martial arts these days take it just as a hobby to attend for 3 times a week. There's a lot of teachers who are sufficient and recognized in multiple arts, but these people hold it as a way of life.
There will be times when I might not be able to train like I train now, but now I can and so I will. That's all I have now, my part-time job and part-time studying and training and that's what I dedicate myself to. Next month I'm off to Thailand for 3 months to train only MT full-time for a while.

davey06
Jul 07, 2009, 11:16 AM
I first started taking Nippon Kenpo, a style of karate taught DC by a man named John Womble, first African-American to teach martial arts in US(not my immediate instructor, but I learned from 3 of his students). It's a blend of Isshin-Ryu, Shorin-Ryu, and Shorin-Ken styles, little kyokushin mixed in there too. Went up to green belt(halfway to black) in 3 years and stopped. Now I'm back after 12 years, studying Shorin-Ken under Dai Nippon Butokukai.

My Sensei, Wayne Williams, was also a NK black belt and former judo player who became official with the DNBK. I also train under Hanshi James Thomas, the No. 2 man in our style. He's also studied under Womble and took 12 years of aikido. Because I was away for so long and starting a new style, I had to start at white belt, but after 8 months of improvement Sensei wants me to go for my orange belt. Guess it never leaves you.

I'd like to take some MMA one day, but money's tight. I can only afford karate right now because it's free, outside of DNBK dues and seminar fees, which really isn't much ($20/year for underbelts, maybe $30 a seminar). As far as fighting style, Sensei says I have a lot of power, but honestly I'm just trying to get back in shape first before I can talk about fighting anybody.

PsychicShadow
Jul 12, 2009, 12:12 PM
Currently training Yoshokai Aikido. Only been 2 years but I think I'll stick to it. Fun, I like my teacher and it's good training physically and mentally.

Mafu
Aug 16, 2009, 04:21 AM
i've trained muay thai and some ground work... also trained a little krav maga recently the most important thing to remember is find what works for you and have fun :)

jlbrow
Aug 16, 2009, 08:07 AM
I practice xingyi and chen taiji. In the past I've practiced yang taiji, muay thai, kali/escrima, and some kajukenbo in college.

JLB

Beast Mode
Aug 31, 2009, 10:22 PM
I started out with viet vo dao for a year and a half, since I was 12. Then did Savate aka boxe francais for about 2 years, till I was 14, then started out with san shou when I finally found a proper school for vietnamese kickboxing to this day I train san shou and wrestling (about 6 years) I still implement a lot of the savate foot work and kicks in my training/sparring. My style would be striking, but I'd like to start BJJ if I find the propper school.

TigerEyes
Sep 07, 2009, 03:25 PM
I started taking martial arts in my college years. The ones I've taken so far are Kempo, Tai Chi, Tang Soo Do, Ninjutsu (but just three classes for that one, unfortunately), Shorinji Kempo (did this while I was studying abroad in Japan for four months), self defense, Akitsukai Karate, and KRAV MAGA!

Krav Maga is what I currently take, but I might be taking Tai Chi as a class at my acupuncture school next quarter.

cheesedog
Sep 08, 2009, 12:30 AM
I always thought Shorinji Kempo was interesting. Once you get to a certain level you are considered a Shinto monk aren't you?

TigerEyes
Sep 08, 2009, 10:45 AM
Huh, I've never heard that. Doesn't mean it's not true, of course.

cheesedog
Sep 09, 2009, 12:07 AM
I don't know much about it either, just something I read years ago. It's at a pretty high level, like 5 degree black or higher, so those guys probably weren't hanging around with the white belts.

TigerEyes
Sep 10, 2009, 12:23 AM
Actually, I was one of three white belts in the entire club. The other two were also foreigners, of course. All the Japanese kids were either brown belts or black belts. They beat us up gooood. :p

Higgy
Sep 12, 2009, 11:15 AM
Kyokushin Karate for me. I love knock down karate. I used to train in MMA on the side but the massive egos of the constant newcomers got to much to bear with the limited time I had to train. I hated showing them something then having them telling me how to do it 3 weeks later only to have me choke them out.

Gez
Sep 21, 2009, 08:22 PM
\Just about to take up krav maga-wondered what you guys thought about it? Was thinking about combining it with muai thai or boxing

IRONPUG
Sep 23, 2009, 01:20 PM
Old school boxing...tried kick boxing but my knees are bad from a stupid skateboarding accident...tore my MCL doing a very strange looking split :lol:

mtguy1976
Sep 26, 2009, 02:55 PM
I've done judo, bjj and muay thai. MT is by far my favorite. I got into it late when I was about 26 (33 now). BJJ is good, but it seemed like I was always getting hurt

rotters
Sep 27, 2009, 03:53 PM
Ju Jitsu and Muay Thai. really enjoy it bloody hard work.




rotters

Hayden6-6
Sep 27, 2009, 08:46 PM
muay thai, boxing, and bjj... have just recently been diving into Judo and sambo, that's some pretty interesting (and hard as hell) stuff! have been thinking about maybe throwing some wrestling in there just to make for a more complete spectrum of the game!:twisted:




Do what you feel and say what you mean because those who mind don't matter, and those that matter don't mind. :cool:
-Dr. Seuss

Junk
Oct 15, 2009, 05:16 PM
Shizen Ryu Goshin Do

I haven't been for a long time, just due to time constraints, but I try to keep up the basics at home. I've lost a lot of my speed, and any heavybag work just highlights how poor my wrists have become. Looking to try and get some wrestling education, but I have no idea where to even start that in this town.

andy3
Oct 28, 2009, 09:23 PM
I'm a wrestler in 10th grade. I go to the Arkansas wrestling academy run by 4 time ncaa champion pat smith. Wrestling would be my base with such a good coach. I also have some bjj basics down.

GamaGama42
Nov 02, 2009, 04:38 PM
I've been studying taijutsu with a bujinkan instructor for almost a year, and battojutsu (Japanese sword) for 9 months. I'm not really good at either of them yet, still learning the basics.

Is anyone else on this forum in the Bujinkan?

BigDan
Nov 08, 2009, 02:08 PM
I practice FMA Kali/Pekiti Tirsia which is a very offensive stickfighting art that employs the use of a 28 to 30inch rattan stick (as well as knives and short sworts like the Bolo "machete" used in the Philipines). It also incorporates groundwork which resembles BJJ on some level but with obvious variations. The best visual example I could provide for those not familiar would be the Dog Brothers MA website( please note that since I am still fairly new here I cannot post the link but a quick Google search under "Dog Brother martial arts" will yield the desired results).

In the near future I will take up Wing Chun. Although FMA Kali/Pekiti Tirsia does teach empty hand striking (even when doing the groundwork), I like Wing Chun for it's straightforwardness and scientific applications.

I like BJJ but I also agree with some here that it has been way overhyped. In reality, BJJ can get you into serious trouble in a real fight. If you happen to get into a fight with someone who is with a friend and you have that person in say an armbar, his friend will likely employ a nice swift kick to your body or head to let go of that armbar so beware of any marketing martial arts "guru" who states that BJJ is the best art for the street. The surrounding environment can also be dangerous in a BJJ scenario (broken glass, rocks, etc,...). Having said this however I will say that if one is trying to gain a career as a cage fighter, then BJJ is a staple in your arsenal of martial arts knowledge. That and Muay Thai. :)

ARealLifePowerRanger
Nov 09, 2009, 01:22 PM
My formal training consist of:

Taekwondo (10 years)
Boxing (3 Years)
Krav Maga (1 Year)
Karate (3 Years)
Kickboxing (1 Year)

Due to my short stature and punching power I am forced to be an in fighter. However I have a problem of sticking out on outside especially when tired which I am sure my opponents love.

I am aggressive and rely on quick and powerful combinations. I have a good jab but need to focus on doubling it up. I dont move my head nearly enough and usually take 4-5 punches to give on good one back. I am pretty talented with my legs and sometimes sacrifice winning just to pull of tricky and useless kick.

pHr34K
Jan 02, 2010, 11:10 AM
I do Boxing and Karate Shotokan.Boxing is for my punching skills and karate is for my kneeing,elbowing and mostly kicking skills.I like a lot Muay Thai,but there is no MT gym in my town.

AshersUK
Jan 02, 2010, 11:32 AM
#1 Kickboxing
#2 Muay Thai
#3 Brazilian Jiu Jitsu
#4 Mixed Martial Arts

Kickboxing is my main MA and I'm planning my first amatuer fight but I have a problem with the "light" in "light contact". Can't wait till it's time to move on to full contact really.

Muay Thai because I enjoy the art, it's really where kickboxing started, I enjoy elbowing people in the skull, kneeing them in the face and then throwing them across the floor/ring.

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu for the MMA aspect. You can't just be a standing fighter in a fight that could quite simply end in submission.

MMA because it's fun, the whole learning side of it is enjoyable and helpful in many situations and isn't restricted to 1 art, you can learn a lot from it but in a cage or ring it can be very brutal, but I like that.

Also I train with the ISKA Super Middleweight World Champion and a ISKA European Champion (unsure of her weight but she's a 15 year old that'd kick my ass anyway).

Tgarber77
Jan 02, 2010, 07:56 PM
Anyone familiar with the Hawaiian martial art alled 'Lua'?

cheesedog
Jan 03, 2010, 01:35 AM
Anyone familiar with the Hawaiian martial art alled 'Lua'?

Only from reading. Do you practice it? It sounded very interesting, with some "animal forms" that would probably be really cool to see.

Tgarber77
Jan 03, 2010, 03:34 AM
Only from reading. Do you practice it? It sounded very interesting, with some "animal forms" that would probably be really cool to see.

I have studied it, with a friend who is a certified black belt in the art. He started learning it through video correspondence, and taking his test at various seminars with Solomon Kaihewalu. That friend has moved to California to persue one on one instruction. The weapons used are vicious, and the animal forms are definetly different compared to traditional martial arts.

billgetsstrong
Jan 06, 2010, 12:42 AM
Budo Aikido, Hapkido, Tae Kwon Do (ITF & WTF), Yudo, Shorin-Ryu,
Hsing-I, Yang Tai Chi Chuan, Pa Kua Chang.

Mostly I practice Pa Kua and Hsing-i.

Mike Maley
Jan 14, 2010, 12:40 PM
Hi,

I trained in Lau Gar Kuin (southern chinese system) for 5 yrs and the last four months have started training Chow Gar Southern Praying Mantis.
Lots of conditioning, 2 man drills, padwork and applications.

The forms help develop the arms, wrists, back, shoulders, ribs for generation of gen or shock power.

I love it (even though I am the oldest one there :shock: and I feel my age. LOL)

Shaden920
Feb 05, 2010, 06:25 PM
I practice Ninjutsu atm :)

AshersUK
Feb 05, 2010, 07:21 PM
I practice Ninjutsu atm :)

I dabbled in Ninjutsu when I lived in Derby City (England) Was very fun being a shinobi for a few weeks. It was 100% original though. Completely and entirely original unlike a few modern places I've been to.

Raja
Feb 08, 2010, 02:05 AM
Ninjitsu is an interesting and well balanced martial art but man what a bunch of wierdos!

Shaden920
Feb 08, 2010, 09:20 AM
Ninjitsu is an interesting and well balanced martial art but man what a bunch of wierdos!

hahahah xD so true :P

TakadaDojoKeith
Feb 21, 2010, 10:46 AM
Used to do more traditional arts like karate and judo. Now I do submission wrestling and kickboxing.

Gray wolf
Feb 22, 2010, 01:34 PM
I practiced karate for about 10 years, shotokan style, got a 2nd dan black belt, but then i quit due to some problem regarding the place where i trained.

I've been practicing wing chun in the last 2 and a half years, and altough it has its flaws i find it a quite complete and interesting fighting form.

Right now i would like to begin another physical activity, and if i choose another martial art, i would not be sure what to pick up, maybe i would pick up submission wrestling to work on grappling, or maybe ninjutsu because....well, because it's just too cool (someone tries to rob you and wham! shuriken in the head :p ).

petersante
Feb 22, 2010, 10:13 PM
I practiced karate for about 10 years, shotokan style, got a 2nd dan black belt, but then i quit due to some problem regarding the place where i trained.

I've been practicing wing chun in the last 2 and a half years, and altough it has its flaws i find it a quite complete and interesting fighting form.

Right now i would like to begin another physical activity, and if i choose another martial art, i would not be sure what to pick up, maybe i would pick up submission wrestling to work on grappling, or maybe ninjutsu because....well, because it's just too cool (someone tries to rob you and wham! shuriken in the head :p ).
What is flawed about the style of ving tsun you are learning?