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Jul 11, 2006, 07:38 AM
I always wondered about this.
If boxers only punch (push ups like motion) why do they do pull ups.
Do they really need them? It helps some muscles like biceps and wrist, but other wise?

speedy
Jul 12, 2006, 08:36 AM
Pullups not only work the arms, grip, wrist, etc...it also works the back. Take some time and go to Dragon Door and read their articles about pullups. It is those articles that got me to do them, and they are a big part of my workout: plus HSPU.

Appleman
Jul 12, 2006, 10:39 AM
Pull ups help the body to decelerate the punch. You can't throw another strong and powerful punch if you can't retract the previous, can you?

speedy
Jul 12, 2006, 04:00 PM
Don't know about the first part of the statement, but not being able to throw a second one wihout pulling back the first would be a yes. Still, I don't see how this correlates to pullups.

Jul 18, 2006, 09:00 AM
It seems that the more pulling muscles contract, the more they cock the pushing muscles. The pulling muscles stretch the pushing muscles like a spring ready to recoil. This gives a punch a more explosion. That and the acceleration it receives from the lower body and the midsection of coarse.

TO
Jul 19, 2006, 10:43 PM
I always wondered about this.
If boxers only punch (push ups like motion) why do they do pull ups.
Do they really need them? It helps some muscles like biceps and wrist, but other wise?
It is a false assumption that boxers only punch with a push-up motion. Some of the most powerful punches in a boxers arsenal are bent-arm punches (hooks and upper cuts). These punches depend on strong biceps and trunk rotation. The pull-up works the biceps and upper-torso, which make for a strong platform to deliver the shots.

Sandman
Dec 01, 2006, 12:39 PM
I don't feel that you have to pull your arm back to land your most powerfull punch nor is power taken away by not doing so! But ONLY if your arm/fist (whatever is paramount in the projection of your technique to land your specific type of punch) is able to simulate lightning speed at projection and possesses a forward drive of a ballistic missile!!!!!!

Moonduck
Dec 02, 2006, 05:09 PM
I don't feel that you have to pull your arm back to land your most powerfull punch nor is power taken away by not doing so! But ONLY if your arm/fist (whatever is paramount in the projection of your technique to land your specific type of punch) is able to simulate lightning speed at projection and possesses a forward drive of a ballistic missile!!!!!!

Then you've never learned to throw a proper combo. A distinct part of throwing a good jab-cross-hook combo is retracting the previous punch HARD. It is the only way to properly set up the next punch, and a punch without proper set-up is a punch without power.

There is also the stabilising aspect of it. Your back has to be tight at the moment of impact or you will lose force to the elastic movement of the back half of your torso. Pull-ups help you gain sufficient strength to tighten up at the proper moment.

You also probably think that you don't use your back in push-ups and bench pressing too, right?

Sandman
Dec 19, 2006, 01:48 PM
Firstly i would like to clarify that i'm well beyond the combinations that you referred to. As for the techniques you spoke about, If your referring to orthodox boxing or combat styles similar to that then you'd be correct. However being someone who has delved into various eastern martial arts i find your views rather narrow minded to say the least, and rather neanderthal as it shows you don't have the intelligence or the intellect to think that things can be done more effectively, when a path other than your own path is taken.

A further point, could you please ensure in future that before you speak about a subject at least know what you're talking about!!!

Also don't assume that everyone is ignorant & you're the ultimate authority on the subject with your sarcastic, weak & ill thought out comments regarding weight-lifting & fighting, as if they both go together!
What I will say is both have their place in regards to strength, but strength from weight training & strength gained from martial arts is 2 different things, whichever you decide is for you is your choice. If you feel you have to make a choice between the two. I've made my choice though, it's called www.bodyweightculture.com

crazydan
Dec 19, 2006, 03:55 PM
sandman stop being an asshole

Moonduck
Dec 19, 2006, 07:22 PM
I'm glad that I'm not the only person that thought that.

1) I do know something about the subject. Having boxed, done plenty of MA, and lifted weights, I know something by default. I don't claim to be an expert, but it's not hard to know something.

2) "Delved into eastern martial arts" sure sounds more mysterious and cool than "took 6 lessons at the Y" :D

3) How does one get "well-beyond" such combos as the jab-cross-hook? I mean, Muhammed Ali used it. Joe Johnson did. Sugar Ray Robison did. Bruce Lee too. Chuck Norris as well. So you're "well beyond" these guys? Damn, publish a book, dude. Share your wisdom!

Seriously though, you don't ever get "beyond" the basics. You just get better at them. Watch Judo in the Olympics. The judoka there are literally amongst the best in the world. They don't use advanced techniques though. They use basic throws, executed perfectly. Take a look at UFC, or other such competitions. You don't see spinning swallowtail kicks. You see the same basic moves, executed bloody well.

My best advice would be to learn something about physiology and kinesiology, and increase your understanding of body mechanics.

4) I think you'd be surprised to find that quite a number of top fighters use weight-lifting to supplement their training. Heck, I just read an interview with Frank Shamrock talking about the lifting they use in the Lion's Den. I guess those guys are neanderthals too, right?

Back in the day, yeah, weight-lifting was considered to be anamthema to martial artists. This is because they feared getting bulky and slowing down. these days the science of weight lifting has improved far beyond the martial arts community's understanding of it. It is far easier to gain strength without gaining mass than it is to gain mass, and a stronger muscle is a faster one.

crazydan
Dec 19, 2006, 10:05 PM
Yah I agree with everything moonduck said. lol

Sandman
Feb 23, 2007, 12:36 PM
Crazydan stop being an arse licker!!!!

crazydan
Feb 23, 2007, 01:35 PM
lol. he comes back 3 months later just to say that.

koltz
Feb 23, 2007, 02:42 PM
return punches easier = better speed

IronmanUSMC
Feb 23, 2007, 02:54 PM
return punches easier = better speed

Exactly.

Pulling strength deselerate punches. Prevents back injuries, in case a full power punch misses.

Moonduck
Feb 23, 2007, 03:59 PM
lol. he comes back 3 months later just to say that.

I thought the exact same thing, ha!