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SAS 22
May 29, 2010, 07:25 AM
what bodyweight exercises are good to increase puching strength and speed.

phlex
May 29, 2010, 07:58 AM
Yes, especially plyometric moves. google plyo push-up. But more important than raw strenght, coordination, from the foot to the fist through your knees, hips and core muscles is the key factor.
This is why exercises like ladder foot work are very important, and core work crucial.

rickvv
May 29, 2010, 10:50 AM
OK, I'm not trying to be a smartass or anything, but because of the title of the thread, I couldn't resist. There's been a couple of times that I wished that I just kept my mouth shut. I'm hoping that this isn't going to be another one.

My thoughts on this are, since boxers and MMA fighters so frequently hurt their hands, and they go to such elaborate measures to protect them, why would someone want to learn how to punch harder?

I remember once when I worked in a nightclub, a guy walked in with his hand all bandaged up. I asked him what he did to his hand. He said that he beat some guy up, but he cut his hand up or bruised it on the guy's teeth, or something. He won the fight (according to him), but his hand was busted up or infected or something.

I don't by any means, consider myself an expert in fighting strategies, but I do have one that I developed for myself. One thing that I'm very concerned about is hurting my hands. Most of my strategy involves being able to grab ahold of, and control someone else. So my techniques are geared more toward breaking things (elbows, wrists, shoulders, fingers, etc), with very limited strikes.

The only strikes that I practice are: fist to the throat (don't need to hit hard, it's a serious thing to do), palm strike to the nose (don't want to cut myself on his teeth. It's not a serious strike, it's more of a: I'm pissed off, he's not defending very well, I think I can sneak it in, it's not going to kill him), and fingers to the eyes (very serious, if I'm trying to do this, I'm probably trying to pull his eye out of his head).

As far as defending, I actually practice tilting my head forward, so that if I do get punched while trying to grab the guy's arm, he hits on top of my head and he ends up getting hurt worse than I do. I just want to avoid getting hit with a clean punch that would drop me. Once I get ahold of an arm and get it leveraged, the fight's over as far as I'm concerned. My going to break something (especially if got hit), and then I can do whatever I want to, to a guy with a popped shoulder or broken elbow or whatever.

I know, it sounds pretty gruesome, but I am an old guy who really doesn't want to bother anybody. But if I do find myself in a situation, it's probably because I'm being attacked (because I'm old and I look like an easy target), so I have to make sure that everything that I do, counts. Alot of my ideas come from when I'm watching MMA fights and they say something like, "That's not allowed, that's against the rules". That's a potential technique for me.

rash91
May 29, 2010, 11:13 AM
I get your point rickyy, but what if he's talking about competetive martial arts, and not street fighting?

rickvv
May 29, 2010, 11:46 AM
rash91 - Yeah, I agree with you. I was just trying to express a different viewpoint. When I was growing up, kicking was considered kinda an exotic thing and something that maybe only girls did. In fact, I remember my 6th grade teacher tell a kid in my class that he fought like a girl, because he was kicking in a playground fight. Things have changed from what used to be the norm.

I was just putting out a viewpoint and conclusion that I've come to, but I don't know anyone who agrees with me. But I don't usually go around talking about this either.

I'm a big fan of MMA, by the way. I'm not much of a Boxing fan anymore. But for my own personal style, Chin Na (or what I sometimes refer to as Pitbull Kung Fu) makes the most sense for me to concentrate on. It's not something that I work that much on, I just believe that everybody should have some kind of plan, just in case. I put this in the catagory of seat belts and smoke detectors. They haven't done me any good yet, but you never know.

TheMasterKey
May 29, 2010, 02:11 PM
Alot of my ideas come from when I'm watching MMA fights and they say something like, "That's not allowed, that's against the rules". That's a potential technique for me.

:lol: :lol: :lol:

Fatman
May 29, 2010, 02:22 PM
Bud Jeffries sold a video pack titled How to Hit Like a Freight Train. It's apparently quite good, and he makes some good material.

moeed_eng
May 29, 2010, 03:06 PM
technique is also required and powerful mind to focus you much start punching practice

TheMasterKey
May 29, 2010, 03:23 PM
technique is also required and powerful mind to focus you much start punching practice

Thank God you're safe! We were terribly worried.

Cheeze_Baron
May 29, 2010, 04:44 PM
You could do pushups, but I'd try to concentrate on the lower body as that's where the power gets generated, it ends with the fist but starts from the feet. Besides that I'm sure most get knocked out due to getting hit flushed(not a glancing blow) and the element of suprise/timing as opposed to shear power(which wouldn't hurt to have either).

phlex
May 29, 2010, 04:56 PM
Thank God you're safe! We were terribly worried.

You made me laugh hard!

Back to topic: what kind of punch you want to get strong with? If it's all of them, you'll have to work your flexibility too, and your back.

Ricky, hitting with open palm has its own advantages, like stunning the opponent, when properly landed and lower risk of knuncles injuries. Moreover you can poke your opponent's eyes easily with open hands. Open hands provides better defense when struck by opponent. It is less used because poeple (street) fighting are overflowed by rage and loose a part of their cognitive abilities.

SAS 22
May 29, 2010, 08:13 PM
I probably should have put this in the title, but also if anyone has any ideas on how to punch faster, that would help. My punches i want to improve are jabs and crosses.

Erik
May 29, 2010, 08:18 PM
I probably should have put this in the title, but also if anyone has any ideas on how to punch faster, that would help. My punches i want to improve are jabs and crosses.

I'd suggest going to a boxing gym and working with the trainers there. Jabs and crosses are their stock-in-trade, so they'll give great advice.

Journeyman
May 29, 2010, 09:34 PM
Bud Jeffries sold a video pack titled How to Hit Like a Freight Train. It's apparently quite good, and he makes some good material.
I've heard it's good too. And we all know what jeffries is doing: Heavy one arm presses/push presses, heavy squats, heavy deadlifts. And hitting heavy bags. A lot.


I probably should have put this in the title, but also if anyone has any ideas on how to punch faster, that would help. My punches i want to improve are jabs and crosses.
Punch faster. It really is as simple as that. I did tae kwon do for a few years when I was a little kid and since it's a point-fighting style, speed is really all that matters. Just concentrate on getting your fists/feet to the target as fast as possible. After a few thousand kicks and punches, you will be faster.


I'd suggest going to a boxing gym and working with the trainers there. Jabs and crosses are their stock-in-trade, so they'll give great advice.

X2, if you're serious.

silentassassin
May 29, 2010, 10:23 PM
OK, I'm not trying to be a smartass or anything, but because of the title of the thread, I couldn't resist. There's been a couple of times that I wished that I just kept my mouth shut. I'm hoping that this isn't going to be another one.

My thoughts on this are, since boxers and MMA fighters so frequently hurt their hands, and they go to such elaborate measures to protect them, why would someone want to learn how to punch harder?

I remember once when I worked in a nightclub, a guy walked in with his hand all bandaged up. I asked him what he did to his hand. He said that he beat some guy up, but he cut his hand up or bruised it on the guy's teeth, or something. He won the fight (according to him), but his hand was busted up or infected or something.

I don't by any means, consider myself an expert in fighting strategies, but I do have one that I developed for myself. One thing that I'm very concerned about is hurting my hands. Most of my strategy involves being able to grab ahold of, and control someone else. So my techniques are geared more toward breaking things (elbows, wrists, shoulders, fingers, etc), with very limited strikes.

The only strikes that I practice are: fist to the throat (don't need to hit hard, it's a serious thing to do), palm strike to the nose (don't want to cut myself on his teeth. It's not a serious strike, it's more of a: I'm pissed off, he's not defending very well, I think I can sneak it in, it's not going to kill him), and fingers to the eyes (very serious, if I'm trying to do this, I'm probably trying to pull his eye out of his head).

As far as defending, I actually practice tilting my head forward, so that if I do get punched while trying to grab the guy's arm, he hits on top of my head and he ends up getting hurt worse than I do. I just want to avoid getting hit with a clean punch that would drop me. Once I get ahold of an arm and get it leveraged, the fight's over as far as I'm concerned. My going to break something (especially if got hit), and then I can do whatever I want to, to a guy with a popped shoulder or broken elbow or whatever.

I know, it sounds pretty gruesome, but I am an old guy who really doesn't want to bother anybody. But if I do find myself in a situation, it's probably because I'm being attacked (because I'm old and I look like an easy target), so I have to make sure that everything that I do, counts. Alot of my ideas come from when I'm watching MMA fights and they say something like, "That's not allowed, that's against the rules". That's a potential technique for me.
Rick what about choking out a mofo? I used to wrestle so I know what you mean, gain control of your opponent then attack. I learned this nasty choke from fooling around, its kinda like a standing guillotine but you have way more control when your standing then a guillotine. Believe me once you choke some one out you can do what ever the hell you want to them and odds are whenn they wake up the wont know wtf happened. Also if you get behind someone the " sleeper hold" is great. So not all the good stuff is illegal in MMA

As for punching harder as said punch ALOT but I would think one arm pushup with the oppisite leg only, side pushups, lunges (footwork is a big part of fighting/punching), jumprope, oblique crunch or flag if you can, and rotational ab exercise such as hanging windshield wipers, I would throw pistols in ther for good measure. All exercises should be done for the amount of punches you expect to throw and should be done explosively as possible.

There are alot of other good exercise but they all involve weights

rickvv
May 30, 2010, 11:09 AM
Rick what about choking out a mofo? I used to wrestle so I know what you mean, gain control of your opponent then attack.
Yeah, chokes are good, they take a little bit of time to apply. I was in Judo for awhile, and I found out that they don't take much time tho. I came from a wrestling background too, and at first I underestimated the value of a Gi pulled across your neck to cut off blood flow (afterall, I could still breathe). I learned very quickly, to respect that technique.

Since you come from a wrestling background, maybe you can appreciate this. In wrestling, an armbar behind the back is a good control technique, but not great, because you're limited to go to only 90 degrees with it. It's not that unusual to get an armbar, or to find yourself in an armbar, but it's effect is minimized because of the limitations placed on it.

What if you found yourself in some sort of life and death struggle with someone with a gun, and you got shot. You're still functioning, but you don't know if you're bleeding to death internally, or not. You manage to get an armbar on him, but instead of stopping at 90 degrees, you keep driving on it until you hear his shoulder pop out of joint.

He's laying there on his stomach with a useless arm. How hard do you think it would be, to block up his head and start spinning and driving until something in his neck pops and he goes limp? How long do think all that would take? If you get hit with a fatal shot, you may still have a few seconds left, before your body shuts down. It might be enough time to watch your assailant die.

There's nothing that I described, that is that complicated or that difficult to apply, for someone with a decent level of strength. Obviously, I've never had the opportunity to test this out, to see if it would actually work. But I still can't see any serious flaws in it. Of course, this is an extreme technique, that hopefully you would never find yourself in a situation to use. But if you don't take some time to practice and rehearse, what makes you think that you would react appropriately, in a extreme situation? It's kinda like having school kids do fire drills. I don't know anybody, who's life has been saved because of fire drills. But they still do them, and I'm glad that they do.

Journeyman
May 30, 2010, 11:11 AM
^ And here I am thinking that rickvv is just a sweet old guy who likes to do handstands :shock: :shock:

rickvv
May 30, 2010, 11:41 AM
^ And here I am thinking that rickvv is just a sweet old guy who likes to do handstands :shock: :shock:
My favorite scene the the Karate Kid movie was when the old guy scales the fence in the background, and beats up all the young punks and rescues his young friend.

Maybe I'll start practicing climbing fences. :lol:

Journeyman
May 30, 2010, 11:57 AM
My favorite scene the the Karate Kid movie was when the old guy scales the fence in the background, and beats up all the young punks and rescues his young friend.

Maybe I'll start practicing climbing fences. :lol:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kxZEpZxaeNo&feature=related

silentassassin
May 30, 2010, 12:16 PM
but you know its actually pretty hard to break someones bones/joints.
Finger and wrist locks and chokes are probably the easest to do.
but I see your point.... and chokes dont take long at all, and if your up against someone with no training the once you get it locked up their history.
with other moves its easy to injure someone but putting them out of commision is actually quite difficuilt. Have you ever seen someone break someone elbow in an arm bar in MMA? Probably not, that because it takes alot of force to take out the elbow completely. I hope you will never have to use them but I figure I let you know.

Journeyman
May 30, 2010, 01:02 PM
Have you ever seen someone break someone elbow in an arm bar in MMA? .

Yes.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P3QzX1ZadJM&feature=related

You can't really see it very easily, but apparently his arm was broken.

rickvv
May 30, 2010, 01:15 PM
demarcoa - That parkour video was funny. I now have new role models to emulate.:lol:

silentassassin - I have to respectfully disagree with you on that one. Having been a long time football fan, and seeing knees being taken out by teammates inadvertently falling on them at a bad angle, I've come to the conclusion that we're all quite fragile. So if someone has the intention and focus and has trained to channel his energy into dislocating a joint, I think it's very possible to do.

Arms do get broken and dislocated in MMA. But I think most competitors are respectful enough to back out and allow their opponent to tapped out, and most opponents are smart enough to tapp out.

bloodriotiori
May 30, 2010, 01:55 PM
it's really not that hard to break someones elbow, infact it's almost TOO easy, that's why you have to be careful when fighting or doing certain techniques.

As far as punching harder, there's been some really good advice given here. Work on hip rotation, perfect the straight reverse punch, work on "focusing" as you deliver your punch (work on this punching the air first, then work hitting something soft, then build your way up), learn how to accelerate as you throw the punch and accelerate just as fast as you draw the fist and arm back (same way you'd throw a kick, work on getting that snap back, it's just as important for doing damage as the initial kick is), but most of all, do LOTS and LOTS of punches.

Journeyman
May 30, 2010, 06:38 PM
^ Breaking a joint, especially with the full leverage of your body (as in an arm bar) is actually pretty easy. Breaking a bone is hard but of course that doesn't happen very often.

T-M-D
May 30, 2010, 07:45 PM
If you apply the right leverage you can break an elbow joint with your arms locked only using the lateral movement in your shoulders. The human body is very fragile, when you're talking about MMA etc they might be out there to hurt each other, but they respect each other they don't want to really do damage like breaking joints etc. Knee joints are a lot stronger though, it would take a fair amount of force to break those.

As far as punching faster and more powerfully goes, practice for speed (buy a pair of focus pads and get a training partner) and plyometric push ups for power in the arms, depending on how you want to be punching you'd want to do something like tuck jumps, they'll get tiring quickly but will help you put some power into your legs. Punching is a lot about technique, film yourself punching something like focus pads, compare your technique to a boxer or someone you know can punch properly and see what you need to correct. Also, treat a punch like you treat anything else, you breath out as you punch when you're punching repeatedly you still want to be breathing, a lot of people forget to breath, you lose a lot of power that way.

moeed_eng
May 31, 2010, 07:21 AM
what type of punching arts you would like to learn kung fu,kick boxing or some thing else

in my opiniun learn kung-fu see the video of ip man mentor of bruclee

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3qhPDEOYbx4

rickvv
May 31, 2010, 09:14 AM
Knee joints are a lot stronger though, it would take a fair amount of force to break those.
Yep, I agree with that. If you're a football fan, you've probably seen where an offensive tackle is blocking, and then his teammate gets thrown into him and rolls up the back of his leg, taking his knee out.

My point to all of this is that the human body is pretty fragile, there's weak links nomatter how big and strong you are. There aren't any supermen, men of steel out there. Which I'm glad about, because that means that if you can keep your wits, you may have some chance in almost any situation, against almost anyone. It helps if you can spend a little time thinking things through and maybe rehearsing a little bit; come up with some sort of a plan anyway.

This isn't some sort of big obsession for me, or anything. I don't go around expecting to get into fights, or fight to the death or anything. It's just something that I put in the same catagory as: fire drills, smoke alarms, seat belts, CPR training, and so on. I hope to go through my life and benefit from none of it. I just think that it's worthwhile stuff to know.

Sorry about changing the topic of the thread, but I don't know anyone who shares my viewpoints on punching. I was just looking for a little feedback, afterall, I haven't really tested any of my ideas. I may be way off base on this, but hopefully I'll never find out. So that I can go through the rest of my life thinking that I can beat up anybody. Sometimes it's better to be stupid and ignorant.

FranzZdyb
Jun 07, 2010, 05:17 PM
Clap push-ups (already mentioned).
Russian twist for rotational power.
Most important, get perfect technique and practice all the time.

Foxhound21
Jun 09, 2010, 04:07 PM
if i may say that you better learn the technique.To hit hard,your all body has to be strong,especially legs,core,and back muscles. But also you better learn to punch with great speed,and precission,because that is what is knocking out people and breaking there jaws.

Raja
Jun 15, 2010, 07:09 PM
Relax!

Energy comes from velocity with mass. You can more easily put your mass and increase speed if you relax.

silentassassin
Jun 15, 2010, 10:28 PM
Oh and if you want to increase punching speed and power you must be doing isometrics

OmahaStrength
Jun 27, 2010, 12:12 AM
\\

Punch faster. It really is as simple as that. I did tae kwon do for a few years when I was a little kid and since it's a point-fighting style, speed is really all that matters. Just concentrate on getting your fists/feet to the target as fast as possible. After a few thousand kicks and punches, you will be faster.



This. force= mass x acceleration.

Journeyman
Jun 27, 2010, 08:37 AM
^ I didn't mean that for power. To stick with the same example, at the time I was about 10 or so, and despite my speed obviously I wasn't hitting very hard. You need strength, skill and the ability to use that speed to hit very hard.
Anyone can give a hard shove, and anyone can flick their hand out pretty fast. The trick is to put the two of those together.

Sophielia
Jul 11, 2010, 01:38 PM
Ricky, hitting with open palm has its own advantages, like stunning the opponent, when properly landed and lower risk of knuncles injuries. Moreover you can poke your opponent's eyes easily with open hands. Open hands provides better defense when struck by opponent. It is less used because poeple (street) fighting are overflowed by rage and loose a part of their cognitive abilities.

I think you made a lot of great points about open handed techniques and I agree with you except on eye poking. The reason being it's hard to accurately hit the eyes in a fight and, as a result, easy to hurt your hands on your opponent's skull. Case in point, I know of a karate black belt who was once in a fight and went for an eye poke repeatedly. He missed three times breaking three of his fingers and then eventually got the eye.

As for punching harder, I've learned in my dojo and in Moving Zen: One Man's Journey to the Heart of Karate that the most important thing in developing power is good deep rooted stance. Also, hitting a heavybag will help increase your power.


I probably should have put this in the title, but also if anyone has any ideas on how to punch faster, that would help. My punches i want to improve are jabs and crosses.

Three suggestions:
First, work on your muscular conditioning (there are a lot of good conditioning routines in that forum) otherwise your muscles will get too tired to keep punching fast. Second, try punching holding a small amount of weight (1-10 lbs). Obviously, you'll have to alter technique a bit but after practicing with weight you will be able to punch faster without weight. Three, get a speed ball and look up speed bag drills.

rikrock
Jul 11, 2010, 02:42 PM
These threads always crack me up. Most of the people that want to increase their punching power on here don't even know how to throw a punch correctly let alone hard.You want to punch harder first learn how to punch correctly ie. straight with proper rotation of the body. then work a soft heavy bag for a year or two 3-5 days per week along with some quality sparring for the same time, then come back and ask how to increase your punching power.:rolleyes: Pretty sure you won't be asking that question. Otherwise just keep fantasizing about hitting hard and maybe some day getting into a "fight" with someone where both of you will flail your arms around like a couple of school girls fighting over some boy. Please Moeed don't post ridiculous videos of 10 to 1 odds and the one guy fighting winning, great for the movies but lets stay based in reality shall we, ten guys jump you at the same time you're done.

Thanks I feel better now:D

Journeyman
Jul 11, 2010, 04:54 PM
No no rick that movie was very realistic, you'd be surprised to see how polite muggers are in real life. They take turns to come at you and when you tag them once BAM they lie down and wait for you to finish the others off. :razz:

Dominator350
Jul 11, 2010, 08:19 PM
pretend peoples faces are made of concrete. If you don't know what that feels like punch some concrete. Pretend peoples faces are that.

knuckle pushups
fingertip pushups
planche training(wrist stabilization)

Shadowboxing or heavybag work.

Shaun Hamilton
Jul 19, 2010, 09:46 AM
what bodyweight exercises are good to increase puching strength and speed.

To answer a little bit:
Press-ups 5x5: 3x8;2x12;25x1. Add weight after you complete these.
Over hand pull-ups, as above.
P/bar dips, as above.
Shrugs 5x5.
Lateral raises 5x5.
Anterior d/bell raises, as above.
Bent over d/bell raises, as above.
Triceps kick backs with d/bells,as above.
Over head triceps extention with dumbells(Nigel Benn's favourite).5x5.
Squats b/bell 5x5
Dead lift 5x5.

Heavy bag work. relax and through 5-7 shots as fast and powerfully as you can. shake loose then repeat.
Go through every shot you know. 5x5-3 times per week.
Then focus pad work-out as a boxer would, train with a fighter.
In six months you will be knocking out most guys

Shaun Hamilton
Jul 22, 2010, 11:01 AM
what type of punching arts you would like to learn kung fu,kick boxing or some thing else

in my opiniun learn kung-fu see the video of ip man mentor of bruclee



The Ip Man film, was well made and i enjoyed the Chinese language, very much.
The film was about 1% accurate and in no way trythfully represented the "hero", nor his activities.
Kung Fu is basically a waste of energy as it is a formal art and not really good for any fighting.
Bruce Lee's Jeet Kune Do is better, but, still a waste of time.
If you want to learn to fight, learn boxing and Judo, after several years, you might become ok. Add to these sports WW11 hand to hand, the Fairbairn stuff called gutterfighting. Look for Carl Cestari on youtube
My advise just might save your life.

snobwc
Aug 02, 2010, 06:41 AM
just did a search for that Bud Jeffries How to Hit Like a Freight Train. video, looks alright :)

Kenny1927
Aug 02, 2010, 07:11 AM
Shadow box with LIGHT weights or some sort of resistance band. Bag work, pad work, speed ball, floor to ceiling ball all help with power/speed. I used to love using the floor to ceiling and speed balls and definatly felt a difference in speed after 6/7 months training.

Also, i saw a video on youtube a while back where a guy done as many press ups on his knees and fists for 30 seconds, got up and then punched as many times as possible with weights for 30 seconds. Mite be worth giving it a go

Kenny1927
Aug 02, 2010, 07:12 AM
Shadow box with LIGHT weights or some sort of resistance band. Bag work, pad work, speed ball, floor to ceiling ball all help with power/speed. I used to love using the floor to ceiling and speed balls and definatly felt a difference in speed after 6/7 months training.

Also, i saw a video on youtube a while back where a guy done as many press ups on his knees and fists for 30 seconds, got up and then punched as many times as possible with weights for 30 seconds. Mite be worth giving it a go
Also, make sure you're punching with correct technique (all punches start from the toes and work their way up to the fist.) Work with a boxing trainer if possible.

mercenaryx92
Sep 02, 2010, 11:42 AM
at least 60% of your power comes from your legs and core so work on that but seriously get a heavy bag

tictac1
Sep 02, 2010, 02:15 PM
You need a boxing trainer, period.

You also need a heavy bag, and probably a speed bag.

Your BWE should be done AFTER that stuff, technique should be trained while fresh, and technique is far more important for striking.

You never mentioned what the end goal is, that matters too. Broken hands are common both in MMA and boxing, I don't recommend punching people with your knuckles, way too easy to break yourself, even for very well-trained professional fighters.

That said, i like "hopping" pushups from knuckles to palms. It's plyometric, and develops your ability to quickly tense up the forearms. It seems to have made my heavy bag work more effective.