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View Full Version : Why a Consistent Bodyweight Routine Helps Martial Arts



OzVegan
Aug 09, 2009, 04:31 AM
Three weeks ago I had a surprising experience whist practicing the knife, baton and fist fighting of escrima/arnis.

I perform bodyweight exercises 6 days a week from 5am and have been doing so for three to four years. 3 months from now I'll be forty years old.

So there I was taking on two early to mid-twenty years olds who I asuumed would be pretty fit. 10 minutes into baton fighting one sat down and the other one got up. After some fighting, the second one sat down and I picked up a practice knife and said c'mon. They other guy got up and we knife fought seriously for 10+ minutes. Drenched in sweat, I was taking both on like a tag team wrestling match. We attracted some interested onlookers LOL.We ended with mano-mano. 45 minutes later, they couldn't go on and my arms were bruised as hell. What I noticed was my endurance and strength was much greater than my oponents' who for all intents and purposes should have been all over me fitness wise. I was so surprised because I've never really tested my fitness level against anyone else.

Bodyweight exercise at any age gives one a significant advantage over one's opponents. Man, I need to get those guys to start doing pushps.

Anyone else had an experience which was the result of their exercises?

Raja
Aug 11, 2009, 01:23 PM
Not so much the advantage, but there was a disadvantage I saw in people that didn't train bw much in my Aikido class. They were just not able to move as well, or hold positions.

For those interested, look into mantis kung fu or other styles. They develop MASSIVE leg strength just from bw exercises. Mostly slow movements similar to isometrics. That strength thus translates into devastating blows.

Parth
Aug 11, 2009, 04:13 PM
I agree. Noticed this as well. When I was practicing Karate, I started doing the basic Matt Furey workouts of Hindu Pushups and Squats. I noticed an incredible improvement in my conditioning and lower body strength - something i had not seen from lifting weights and running. I quit the weight room - I think around that time was when I started training more at home (15-16 years old)

Fatman
Aug 11, 2009, 04:21 PM
A lot of martial artists have shitty strength/conditioning routines. Or they don't do them at all, assuming that the MA training is enough. It's not.

Parth
Aug 11, 2009, 04:23 PM
A lot of martial artists have shitty strength/conditioning routines. Or they don't do them at all, assuming that the MA training is enough. It's not.

So maybe it's not so much bodyweight training, it's

You do things outside the dojo vs. your opponent doesn't do anything outside the dojo.

I agree with Raja in that Bodyweight Exercises teach your body to move through a more natural range of motion, meaning more carryover to sports such as martial arts.

EDIT: One more thing is that the majority of people that train at local dojo's do it for a number of reasons. Only a small percentage take it seriously. I personally did it for weight loss reasons, but grew to love it as a sport. Also made me more confident.

Kanik
Aug 11, 2009, 07:07 PM
Well stemming from my obsession with martial arts, I have come to beleive that having a strong body in martial arts isnt one hundred percent essential, as an awesome technique can come from technique and proper understanding and applying of the proper body mechanics, leverage, timing, etc. But that doesnt mean it wont help. Two people of the same skill but different conditioning, the one with the better conditioning will win.

If you look at most traditional arts, say for example, traditional karate, and many styles of kung fu, they have some really great workouts incorporated into there martial arts practice, so that in itself shows how valued a strong and healthy body should be in the martial arts.

Parth
Aug 11, 2009, 08:05 PM
Define strength. Martial arts just requires a different kind of strength. I think body control is better terminology.

OzVegan
Aug 13, 2009, 05:03 AM
A lot of martial artists have shitty strength/conditioning routines. Or they don't do them at all, assuming that the MA training is enough. It's not.

Take Steven Seagal's current physical condition :lol:
He could probably kick my ass, but he'd have to catch me first!

OzVegan
Aug 13, 2009, 05:08 AM
I agree. Noticed this as well. When I was practicing Karate, I started doing the basic Matt Furey workouts of Hindu Pushups and Squats. I noticed an incredible improvement in my conditioning and lower body strength - something i had not seen from lifting weights and running. I quit the weight room - I think around that time was when I started training more at home (15-16 years old)

Yeah, it's funny, I didn't notice it before because I hang around groups like this or work with people who don't do shit so there is never a comparison to be made.

I've always exercised and always attributed my fitness to my age in earlier years. Now I think it's just fitness due to consistent exercise.

Fatman
Aug 13, 2009, 06:06 AM
Take Steven Seagal's current physical condition :lol:

Yeah, WTF, he's really let himself go. The bodypart that used to be his face is larger and saggier than most people's behinds.

huceree
Aug 28, 2009, 03:08 PM
A few years ago I was doing a lot of bodyweight squats very consistently. Approximately 2 set of 100 every day but weekends. When I attended sparring class I figured out that I could keep my leg up for the entire round and use it to push away / kick / defend my partner. It was awesome!