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Kendo
Feb 13, 2009, 07:33 AM
So whats the best martial arts for self defence? am off to try join the french legion this time next year.

any help would be great guys

whmaine
Feb 13, 2009, 08:16 AM
for self defense? Carry a gun that you have a permit to use. Without knowing you, your strengths and weaknesses, etc., there's no way we could tell you THE art for you. And even then, if we ALL agreed (which pretty much doesn't happen anyway), you might try it and hate it.

If you want to join the Legion, I'd worry about building up your overall conditioning levels. Then you'll be in a good place to learn what THEY want you to learn, without having to unlearn a different art.

Do some searches, read, post, learn. Good luck, and welcome!

stealthlynx
Feb 13, 2009, 08:55 AM
For self defense there are various systems out there right now which are based on the premise of simply using natural body reactions for when an attack is coming , this means that you do not have to memorize 100 different complicated techniques because based on some research when you find yourself in an unexpected dangerous situation you will only remember 3% of what you learned , this is because of the adrenaline and some other neurological factors. So there are some martial arts which their sole purpose is teaching you to sharpen your reflexes and natural body mechanics , simple movements which are effective and that you can program into your muscle memory. Some arts which promote this kind of thing are : jeet kune do , wing chun , krav maga , and boxing. I also recommend the Offensive Fighting Tactics dvd's by John Lopez , they have a lot of information on this matter and he has taught them to police officers , swat and military personnel.

gilstrap
Feb 13, 2009, 02:08 PM
cower like a child hold your hands up in fear and when there guard drops kick them in the balls works every time failing that buy a gun or hire a body guard

cheesedog
Feb 13, 2009, 03:22 PM
All of the French Foreign Legion guys I have known have been complete lunatic bad-asses. I don't know whether they got that way BEFORE joining or if the training they got in the legion made them that way. I would recommend doing some research and finding out what type of self defense they teach.

Parth
Feb 13, 2009, 07:20 PM
Hit the guy in the balls and run. If it's a girl, then just push her away. If you're held at gunpoint, then watch a Jackie Chan movie, I think in Rush Hour he shows Chris Tucker how to take a gun away from someone. Try that.

Erik
Feb 13, 2009, 11:58 PM
You're in the army. They give you a weapon. Learn to use it. Well.

Raja
Feb 14, 2009, 12:35 AM
Nothing like bustin' a cap in someone's a$$.

gilstrap
Feb 14, 2009, 01:13 PM
im not an expert on the military , but getting inside a big tank is pretty sound advice,also make sure you join a force which has the most troops and the best weapons im from the uk but would probably plum for one of the big 3 usa,china,russia not very patriotici know but patriatism and self defense are two different things.

billgetsstrong
Feb 25, 2009, 08:59 AM
something which includes striking, grappling and throwing. it must include a detailed study of anatomy and it's weaknesses. You can't carry a gun in jail or most places anyway. They can't take your body away from you.
If you join the military they will have their own stuff for you anyway.
The Marines use taekwondo since vietnam. some okinawan kempo as well.
works really good in a fight. Hapkido is a good all around style which includes all ranges and weapons skills. Traditional taekwondo still teaches
bayonet skills too. There is no one style beats them all. it's up to you to make it work. you have to train hard and many years to get good at martial arts. It ain't stage magic.

JustBlaise
Feb 25, 2009, 10:20 PM
The best martial art ? None, really.

Ignoring the fact that joining the legion would give you a gun, and that you'll learn to fight once in the legion, getting caught up trying to learn the intricacies of any specific martial art will tie you up when, at crunch-time, you should be reacting. Even Krav maga, which is one of the fastest systems to learn, has a bunch of tertiary nonsense about disarming an opponent when unarmed. I'm sure I'm probably understating its effectiveness, but real life isn't a movie, and even the dumbest of armed opponents won't get within grabbing range if they have a gun. And if they have a knife, you can disarm them, but don't expect to not get cut.

But I digress. My former kickboxing instructor taught us about streetfighting in 30 minutes, after we had pestered him about which move would be the best to take out a thug. I'd like to think of it as the difference between a uniform and a dress code: the former gives you no room for variation, while the latter is about the overall result. And here it is, in four easy steps:

(1) Aim for that which let's your opponent talk (throat); don't let him hit yours.

(2) Aim for that which let's your opponent see (eyes); don't let him hit yours.

(3) Keep your opponent from walking (i.e. hit his knees, stomp his foot), but don't let him keep you from walking, i.e. don't let him hit your knees/feet, and DON'T END UP GROUNDFIGHTING.

(DON'T END UP GROUNDFIGHTING)

(DO. NOT. END. UP. GROUNDFIGHTING. It really is that important.)

(4) Aim for your opponents privates; don't let him hit your privates.

Four striking points, that's all you'll ever need. No super-duper arm breaks, or chokeholds, or pressure points only Jet Li could hit. To make it easier, I'll give you a bit of a rhyme:


"Stop his talk.
Stop his see.
Stop his walk.
Stop his pee."


And run away (but that's implied).





If you must get more in-depth, pick up the books by Rex Appglegate or William Fairbairn. Highly effective systems, although I don't know who you'll convince to let you practice a majority of the techniques on :p In terms of learning other martial arts, you can still keep this rhyme in mind, which will help you narrow down which moves you "hard-wire" into your memory (I believe someone else already said the same thing, basically).

Hope this helps.

David43515
Feb 26, 2009, 01:40 AM
Since you say that you want to enlist in a year you don`t plan on staying at one school too long. I`d look for something that is easy to learn and retain. For that a school offering military combatives is ideal (but usually hard to find). So search for Defendo, CQC, CQB or like the others mentioned run a search on Rex Applegate, Douglas Fairbairne, and Carl Cestari. Thier meathods are simple to learn, easy to use, and easy to remember. Also everything has already been proven to work.

Something else you might want to look into is Fillipino martial arts like Arnis, Escrima, or Kali. They`re different from most martial arts because they`re based on concept rather than technique, they also teach weapons first.(Mostly baton and knife) The plus side is that since it`s based on a concept instead of a specific technique, every thing you learn can be done with a knife, with empty hands, with a baton or anything else that you happen to pick up.

Either of these should give you a nice base quickly. Then you can continue to build on that with whatever training you might get in the military.

I`d stay away from things like Hapkido, Tae Kwon Do, etc. They`re decent styles, but the way you train is the way you react. I`ll say that again, the way you train is the way you react. So you may not want much submission type grappling or high kicking. Neither is very helpful when you`re tired from carrying all your gear for the last 30 miles, or when you`re wearing a ton of stuff. Despite the sport competitions you see on pay for view the best submission is still a KO and the main point of unarmed combatives is still to keep you in the fight until you can access a weapon.

David43515
Feb 26, 2009, 01:47 AM
You're in the army. They give you a weapon. Learn to use it. Well.

You aren`t allowed to carry that weapon with you unless you`re in a combat zone. That`s why you run into Servicemen all over the world in airports, bar, and on the beach who aren`t carrying a rifle.

I can`t speak for other countries armed forces, but you would also be suprised at how often soldiers in the U.S. services are put on guard duty with firearms but no ammunition. (or are given ammunition but are ordered not to load thier weapons without direct permission from a superior officer.)

David43515
Feb 26, 2009, 01:55 AM
Once you get into the service and are traveling in lots of new strange cities, remember the advice Douglas Fairbairne used to give his Commandos in WWII.

1) Never fight fair. Two or more of you against one man if it`s at all possible.

2) Never, never,never be unarmed. That may mean carrying a firearm or knife, but it could also mean carrying a heavy set of keys on a lanyard or a steel pen, a roll of coins, a walking stick a tightly rolled up magazine (have a buddy "stab" you in the chest a couple times with one and you`ll see what I mean) etc.

billgetsstrong
Feb 26, 2009, 05:56 AM
I am. All the BS from nonvets counts for squat in my book.
Anyone can say anything. I have my 214 and it clearly states
the places I've been in ACTUAL COMBAT in.
All AMERICA'S special forces use HAPKIDO, TAEKWONDO and
OKINAWAN KEMPO. From time to time different things are tried out
but are soon dropped. The 3 arts I listed are simple direct and deadly.
All their techniques can be done while holding a blade so you do not need to learn another style to knifefight. Remeber this stuff was originally done while holding blades. I'm not taling about sport versions or school that teach civilians for $$$.

All that ww2 stuff is just JUDO. Judo came from jujutsu.
As did HAPKIDO. DAITO-RYU AIKIJUJUTSU to be exact.
Real SAMURAI art not watered down sport like JUDO.
Get your facts straight. Call it Judo and give credit to
the actual creator Jigaro Kano. Not some white guy who ripped
it off and pawned it as his own. Peace.

David43515
Feb 26, 2009, 06:59 PM
I am. All the BS from nonvets counts for squat in my book.
Anyone can say anything. I have my 214 and it clearly states
the places I've been in ACTUAL COMBAT in.
All AMERICA'S special forces use HAPKIDO, TAEKWONDO and
OKINAWAN KEMPO. From time to time different things are tried out
but are soon dropped. The 3 arts I listed are simple direct and deadly.
All their techniques can be done while holding a blade so you do not need to learn another style to knifefight. Remeber this stuff was originally done while holding blades. I'm not taling about sport versions or school that teach civilians for $$$.

All that ww2 stuff is just JUDO. Judo came from jujutsu.
As did HAPKIDO. DAITO-RYU AIKIJUJUTSU to be exact.
Real SAMURAI art not watered down sport like JUDO.
Get your facts straight. Call it Judo and give credit to
the actual creator Jigaro Kano. Not some white guy who ripped
it off and pawned it as his own. Peace.


You`re right (almost) on one point. Fairbairne, Applegate, and Cestari were all well versed in Judo. (One of Fairbairne`s assistants actually got all his Judo training upto 2nd dan from Kano himself.) But they also realized that a soldier in full kit can`t use alot of it. And someone who has very limited training time can`t learn much of it. That`s why there`s actually very little Judo in the old WWII hand-to-hand training.

Just as you said Hapkido and Tae Kwon Do are good systems if they`re not trained for sport. But good luck finding a school that trains for anything else. But the main reason I steered the original poster away from them is that he says he has less than a year to get his basic fight training in. That`s not alot of time no matter what style you`re practicing.The things I suggested were designed to take a person with absolutely zero experiance and give them a firm understanding of basic principles in CQC in a short time. It`s proven effective, easy to learn, easy to retain, and to remember under stress. It`d also give him a base to build further training on once he gets to where he`s going and can look into what`s available there.

Nope, I`m not a vet. My father was In the 1st Infantry Division from Feb 1940-August 1945 and until his unit was sent into combat in '42 his job was training men to go back to thier units and teach H2H and advanced bayonet training. He started me in Choy Lay Fut when I was 8 and then began teaching me the WWII stuff when I was in JR High. I`ve trained the last 34 years in Choy Lay Fut and Northern Shaolin, 12 years in IsshinRyu karate, and 8 years in Kali and Silat. I`ve trained with both former and active duty military personel all my life (U.S. and other countries) . When I lived in the States and had my own school, I trained several active duty personel including helping one of my teachers who was teaching the Special Forces at Ft. Bragg under contract with the DOD. And I spent 6 years working as a bouncer to help pay the bills. But since I`m not a vet I guess my opinion, based on what the original poster says he needs, doesn`t carry any weight. Fair enough.

billgetsstrong
Feb 27, 2009, 08:19 AM
I was just concerned about the stereotyping. The stuff I got in the Marines works real well, even as I age. Just trying to keep it real.

I like choy li fut. You train with doc fai wong? Isshin-ryu was also one of the things we got in the Marines. Very basic and tight. I respect all styles.
I just hate getting into thinking that one style is better than another.
It's all down to the fighter in the end. We also got hwarang-do which really is just a break away hapkido style. Personally the jointlocking and breaking I learned in Hapkido worked really well under stress of combat.
The TKD techniques worked as well because it was kept simple. But if someone is going into the military it should be kept simple. Under stress
things tend to get bogged down too easily. The standard chop and hammerfists and spearhands work well. The backfist to the temple is out due to the helmet in the way often. But the young ones in Iraq aen't facing standard dress soldiers. Poor young guns. It sucks to fight an enemy who hides in civilian clothing and self destructs. Modern day
kamikazi's. So what's your favorite form?

David43515
Mar 01, 2009, 07:32 PM
Yeah you`re right, it`s not the style it`s the fighter. I hope I didn`t come off like too much of an asshole. I`ve seen Hapkido and Hwarang-do, but I`ve never personally trained in them. They seem like good solid styles. I was just trying to think where a kid who`s had no training would get good basics fast that might help him learn more later.

I don`t envy anybody having to serve in the middle east. Never knowing who to trust and who`s out to die as long as they can take you with `em. But I figure a soldier is more likely to have to rely on hand to hand when he`s away on leave than when he`s working in the field. Of course if you`re handling prisoners I suppose that`s a whole different story. I`ve never been there and done that so I don`t wanna get into assuming too much.

As far as forms I still like the basics. In Isshin Ryu I think I liked Seiuchin or Naihachi the best. In Choy Lay Fut I think I liked 5 Wheel Fist the best because it changes directions alot. I grew up in Ohio so I`ve never met Doc Fai Wong. I`d like to someday if I ever get out to California. My wife`s family is from Hokkaido Japan, and I`ve been here for the last 4 years. Seems like everyone here does Judo or Kyokushinkai Karate.