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csg148
Dec 04, 2008, 11:23 PM
I have been prcticing Taekwondo for about a year now and am hooked. I am facinated with the martial arts now because of it. I had mentioned to a fellow practioner that I would be interested in competition sarring and he gave me a workout to get me ready. This is the workout he used when he was competeing and I wanted to get any suggestions or modifications anyone might have. My goal is to increase flexibility, strength, endurance and weight loss.

Three times a week.

Joint circles- start with neck and work to ankles.

5 sets of each (working to 50 reps per set)

push ups (alternating hand positions)
twisting crunches
squats (jumps, split jumps)

stretches from head to legs

20 front kicks, side kicks, roundhouse kicks each leg

roundhouse alternating legs each time as fast as possible 2 minutes.

3-5 two minute rounds on heavy bag.

On alternating days as this workout 2-5 mile run.

TheMasterKey
Dec 04, 2008, 11:32 PM
5 sets of each (working to 50 reps per set)

push ups (alternating hand positions)
twisting crunches
squats (jumps, split jumps)

Add pullups and burpees.

csg148
Dec 04, 2008, 11:38 PM
I agree 100% with the pull ups. Should I add the burpees to the beginning of the set of the end or does it matter. What purpose will the burpees serve if I am doing push up and jump squats?

I should have also added that there are no rests between sets. Is this also a good idea or should a rest period be between sets.

Thank you

TheMasterKey
Dec 05, 2008, 12:03 AM
Experiment, keep whatever way is harder.

REMsimpson
Dec 05, 2008, 02:10 PM
You need a rest period between sets to avoid over-training and to prime the body for bursts of explosive activity from a relative resting state. Also, save static stretches for the end of your session, not at the beginning or middle. Static stretches before activity can actually have a negative effect on overall flexibility and joint stability. If the TKD you’re doing emphasizes high kicking and the associated stretches, spend some extra time on developing the musculature around the knee joints and hip articulations so that they still work right in 10 years. Look up “dynamic stretching” or “functional stretching” for some ideas. There are a few links to this up on tkri dot wordpress dot com if you search around on previous posts.

I also notice that you’re in St. Louis- it would be highly worth checking out the TKRI (Traditional Karate Research Institute) led by Robert Miller. He is a wealth of the sort of information you are looking for and incorporating modern sports science into very practical, brutal and usable karate/martial arts training. Look for TKRI and Miller up on Craigslist, or PM me for his contact info.

Dave.cyco
Dec 05, 2008, 06:44 PM
Experiment, keep whatever way is harder.

Darn right!

Rage
Dec 15, 2008, 01:15 PM
theres nothing for your hamstrings in there, you need to keep your body balanced to prevent injuries which could set you back in your training. Do lunges, step ups and lunge jumps and glute ham raises if you can. I'd add in a few calf raises and angle hops as well. The bulk of your time should be spent on stretching, kicking, punching and anaerobic conditioning if you want to compete in competition. Long slow distance runs won't help you a whole lot for competition. Rosstraining has alot of good information and a few sample workouts for conditioning if your interested.

frankenskid
Dec 15, 2008, 01:33 PM
Rage, could you give me a bit more of an explanation on the angle jumps?

t0aster
Dec 26, 2008, 11:57 PM
Considering that Taekwondo is a kick heavy martial art I would perhaps focus on the legs more than upper body training. Sure, if you are just exercising I would be all for every muscle getting equal treatment but I remember kicking a lot more than punching in my old classes, and your title seemed to suggest a workout for class improvement.

Dave.cyco
Dec 27, 2008, 01:07 AM
As cool as the kicks in TKD are, I must admit that I shake my head every time I see a video od TKD people in competition. There hands are always just flopping around uslessly.

CSG148, if you're still with us, I would highly encourage you to cross train with kick boxing, even if it is just for a month or two. The basics you learn there will round you out as a fighter, even if some of it seems inapplicable to your art.

itlives
Dec 27, 2008, 02:50 PM
Nobody else said it , so I will, don't forget to spar ALOT.
All the training in world won't help you if you're not used to reacting to someone in front of you.

Here in Shreveport, all the schools ( well, almost) have good relationships with one another.
If I want to get someone ready for a tournament I would ask one of the other schools if I could bring in a student to spar with theirs.

You can become used to fighting your school-mates and never become "challenged".

It's sort of like cross-training. Switch up.

When you do go to tournament, exchange phone#'s and contact information with others. You can meet outside of the circuit and further each other in your training.

csg148
Dec 27, 2008, 05:58 PM
Dave.cyco - In my TKD class we concentrate very heavily on the self defense aspect of TKD and not the sparring. We use alot of punches, knees and elbows along with our kick training. I do have to agree that when TKD classes concentrate on the sparring aspect, they teach to forget your hands are even there. I however like the sparring and would like to eventually try it in competition.

tOaster - I am trying to create an even balance of training and stength building. I'm sure like most everyone else, I only have a short amount of time to cram all of the trianing I want to accomplish together. I read posts all the time about ways to train and most of them talk about strength training in the morning and skill training in the afternoon with cardio in between. Thats just not practical, but unfortunately probably the most effective thing to do.

Thank you all for all of your replies also. I appreciate all of your help and guidance.

Journeyman
Dec 27, 2008, 06:58 PM
we concentrate very heavily on the self defense aspect of TKD

No offense, but that is oxymoronic.

Dave.cyco
Dec 27, 2008, 07:37 PM
...we concentrate very heavily on the self defense aspect of TKD and not the sparring. We use alot of punches, knees and elbows along with our kick training.

That's definitely good to know.

Demarcoa, don't you mean it seems oxymoronic based on the TKD style you studied, which is likely different than what CSG148 studies?

Journeyman
Dec 27, 2008, 08:04 PM
That's definitely good to know.

Demarcoa, don't you mean it seems oxymoronic based on the TKD style you studied, which is likely different than what CSG148 studies?

True enough, I shouldn't say things like that when I'm not sure. Let me rephrase: Traditional TKD is practically useless for real world self defense unless you are a true master. If you are learning it for a sport, then practice it as a sport. If you want to learn how to defend yourself when fighting for your life, then do that. Sorry to seem aggressive.

csg148
Dec 28, 2008, 01:33 PM
I can see how most TKD schools play up the sport aspect, which will fail greatly in a street fight. Our school practices much diferent. We practice throws and joint manipulation as well as the punches and kicks I mentioned earlier. We also emphasize the importance of lower kicks versus the higher kicks. We stole alot from other styles and incorporated it with traditional TKD training.

Which leads back to the main question, regardless of the fighting style, what would be the best way to incorporate skill training with strength training?

Dave.cyco
Dec 28, 2008, 01:43 PM
You're a TKD guy, so kicking is huge. What's the most important part of your body for kicking??? CORE! Train your core like a champ, make that priority number 1, then worry about legs and hips they are a close second. That doesn't mean do core first, it just means devote more energy to it. And don't neglect upper body, grip and neck.

Watch Paul Zaichik's Youtube videos. He has Kicking tutorials that you may learn something new from (I did, even after years and years of exposure to different martial styles).

Make sure you train with emphasis on strength, flexibility, power, endurance and speed. You'll need them all.

itlives
Dec 28, 2008, 08:38 PM
I think I'd put them in this order:
flexibility- so you don't hurt yourself
power - which, to me, incorporates the focus
speed - get the fight over quickly with precise hits
endurance - in case the other guy is equal in all the others
strength - to weather the storm

Remember- mass X speed = power

I can put a candle out from 2' away using a palm strike, that's speed with focused power.

I can't do half the exercises in this website, that's lack of strength and endurance.

I worked on certain things and neglected others, now I'm trying to catch back up. It's harder when you have as much experience ( read that- age;-)) as I do!

I think there's enough experienced people on this site that we should all be well-rounded atheletes.

Dave.cyco
Dec 28, 2008, 08:44 PM
I think there's enough experienced people on this site that we should all be well-rounded atheletes.

That's the goal, and there's no place better for it!

gingersi
Dec 29, 2008, 06:11 AM
As cool as the kicks in TKD are, I must admit that I shake my head every time I see a video od TKD people in competition. There hands are always just flopping around uslessly.

CSG148, if you're still with us, I would highly encourage you to cross train with kick boxing, even if it is just for a month or two. The basics you learn there will round you out as a fighter, even if some of it seems inapplicable to your art.

too right!!

i trained TKD for years but for the last 5 have been mixing it with kickboxing/grappling to make a more rounded fighter.

it took a while to un-learn the bad habits from WTF TKD- ie hands down no real guard

it is also useful to be able to mix it as pure TKD (unless you are He Il Cho) is not that useful on its own- so you need to borrow some hand work and close work to complement your kicking

itlives
Dec 29, 2008, 08:29 AM
WTF -:lol::lol:-TKD

With the rise of the UFC, we all know importance of being a well-rounded fighter.
It's been said that 90% of all fights end up on the ground ( at least for one of the fighters).

Those that put one art over another, are putting their faith something invented by man. That's just not right.

gingersi
Dec 29, 2008, 11:29 AM
WTF -:lol::lol:-TKD

With the rise of the UFC, we all know importance of being a well-rounded fighter.
It's been said that 90% of all fights end up on the ground ( at least for one of the fighters).

Those that put one art over another, are putting their faith something invented by man. That's just not right.

thats right man- not to say that TKD sucks, just that is is not a complete fighting system and requires other cross training

csg148
Dec 29, 2008, 01:47 PM
Itlives thank you for the advice. Could you explain the difference or give examples of exercises for strength, power and speed. Also I am confused with stretching im told after the workout or before. Should it be both or wouldnt that lead to injury of over stretching.

I have revamped my routine because of all your responses.

1. joint circle and light warm up
2. Dynamic stretches
3. forms training
4. Shadow boxing and heavy bag- incorporating as many, kicks, and hand strikes as possible.
5. circuit training- various push ups, legs (mostly plyo- jump squats, jump lunges), core (V-ups, lower back stuff), pull ups
6. burpees
7. static stretches

This takes about 45 min to an hour three to four times a week.

I should also mention that my father in law is my TKD instructor and my wife was severely abused by a juijitsu practitioner ex- boyfriend. I enjoy the combat arts and stay with TKD to keep the family happy. I even mention juijitsu and im on the sofa for a week.:???:

Dave.cyco
Dec 29, 2008, 02:31 PM
Burpees are good for power, speed and endurance. You should try devoting a whole session to them at least once. In addition you could do power overs and regular clapping pushups, and work up to double and triple claps.

Jiujutsu isn't the only grappling art, you know. If you enjoy traditional martial arts, then you would probably find Hap Ki Do to be right up your alley. It's a Korean art that incorporates TKD style kicks with some grappling, LOTS of trapping (joint locks, etc...) and decent striking. I say decent because a kickboxer or boxer would be a superior striker, but Hap Ki Do strikes are very powerful, though slow due to reliance on momentum from large circles.

Journeyman
Dec 29, 2008, 03:49 PM
I can see how most TKD schools play up the sport aspect, which will fail greatly in a street fight. Our school practices much diferent. We practice throws and joint manipulation as well as the punches and kicks I mentioned earlier. We also emphasize the importance of lower kicks versus the higher kicks. We stole alot from other styles and incorporated it with traditional TKD training.


That's cool. My school we tried to use traditional methods for 'self-defense'. I soon learned that those would be practically useless.

itlives
Dec 29, 2008, 08:09 PM
Good advice Dave ,as usual.

csg - I would do forms one day and the bag work the next day.

We always practiced TKD forms like this;

1 time for technique
1 time for speed
1 time for power
1 time for all three

Depending on how many forms you know, it could take quite a while.

I can't do all my Kung-Fu forms in one day ( correctly ,anyway).
They are a bit longer than TKD forms though.

Erik
Dec 29, 2008, 09:52 PM
I used to do something similar. One time for power, one time for flow, one time for both.

It's a good drill.

stevenl
Jan 08, 2009, 01:38 PM
Heavy, low volume squats and deadlifts. Ridiculous amounts of flexibility training, and pullups.