PDA

View Full Version : Good way to train reflexes?



Just Jack
Nov 28, 2008, 10:27 AM
Hey I wanna start training my response time and reflex to be faster and more efficient. I was thinking of sparring with my brother. What would be the best way to train that way?

BlackKing
Nov 28, 2008, 10:33 AM
Have him punch at random and you try to block it or bob or side step or weave. What ever you want to do when he punches.

EvilOne
Nov 28, 2008, 11:34 AM
how about a less injury prone suggestion. get some rackett balls and let someone whip them at you and try to catch them. just vary the distance.

Dave.cyco
Nov 28, 2008, 11:55 AM
Yay dodgeball! Dodgball with pineapples.:razz: Oh sorry, something NOT injury prone, right...

olinek
Nov 28, 2008, 12:26 PM
Get the book 72 shaolin arts or something like that. Sure sure, most will say the book is lame and silly and what not.. but I actually believe lots of the exercises could be quite beneficial to developing reflexes and accuracy.

USMC machine
Nov 28, 2008, 04:09 PM
Have him punch at random and you try to block it or bob or side step or weave. What ever you want to do when he punches.

Good method.

I do this standing against the wall so there's no room to 'run away' make sure they are wearing at least 12oz gloves, (preferably 16oz) and not trying to take your head off with the punches.

Dominator350
Nov 28, 2008, 04:45 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iWWl7tjxe6Q

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jk_Ai8qT2s4&feature=related

watch these two videos very interesting information on street combat... and defense.

Journeyman
Nov 28, 2008, 07:14 PM
Yay dodgeball! Dodgball with pineapples.:razz: Oh sorry, something NOT injury prone, right...

What about durians, that would be fun too...

really though, one thing you could do (this sounds silly too) is to 'fight' your tv. When the scene changes, throw a punch, kick, whatever. But only then. And you don't know when the scene will change either...kind of fun. I never got the hang of it.

Dave.cyco
Nov 28, 2008, 07:19 PM
People still watch TV?

Just Jack
Nov 28, 2008, 07:30 PM
What about durians, that would be fun too...

really though, one thing you could do (this sounds silly too) is to 'fight' your tv. When the scene changes, throw a punch, kick, whatever. But only then. And you don't know when the scene will change either...kind of fun. I never got the hang of it.


Wow, this actually sounds really fun! haha, Thanks for the replies guys. I'll try out all of your suggestions.

Salty24
Nov 29, 2008, 08:58 AM
Theres plenty of ways; The first is to play action video games, they will increase your reaction time to stimuli, however once you get used to a video game the benefit will be less. Basically you want one which is fast paced and will cause you to react quickly, for example counter strike.

Secondly (my favourite) is to find a forrest/woodland with a variety of branch heights lower than your head and uneven ground. You try and run through this as fast as you can while not touching and branches and maintaining your feet. It is mighty tough, don't try sprinting too quickly as you may break your ancle or poke your eye out, which no one wants.

Thirdly you can get one of those oddly shaped rubber balls which you throw at the wall and come off at strange angles then try and catch it.

Finally you should also be more sport specific, when you shadow box visualise your opponent and the "signs" for what punch he is going to throw (ie shifting of weight, he may drop his hand slightly before he jabs, etc). That way when you visualise these signs you react in your shadow boxing to parry/slip/counter the punch cementing a response to the action in your mind.

Also like others have suggested here, get a mate to just stand in front of you and very slowly get them to just throw combinations at you while gradually increasing the speed of the punches until you can parry/block them like it is nothing. Hope this has helped mate :)

Dominator350
Nov 29, 2008, 11:34 AM
People still watch TV?


i was thinkin the same thing.

Just Jack
Nov 29, 2008, 03:18 PM
Wow thanks Salty. I guess there's plenty of ways to do this. I just didn't think... :|

I recently started shadow boxing and that tidbit also helped. Thanks alot!!

REMsimpson
Nov 30, 2008, 10:34 AM
Google "TKRI Blog On the Grid" (Still can't post links). The pictures on this post are of my backyard training area, specifically a frame I made to hang a variety of targets from. The targets are tennis balls, water filled soda bottles wrapped in padding and a few other bits. Once you get into the groove with striking and avoiding one target, add a second. Work on combinations of 2-3 strikes on one target, then transition to the other one without letting either of them sneak around and bop you. It's tougher than it sounds. The bottles are supisingly solid targets that will be more solid the harder you hit them, so some resistance is thrown in to the mix.

Right now I have 4 bottle targets and several tennis balls at various heights going. Standing in the center of that and trying to deliver 2 strikes per target and move from one to the next is excellent reflex training- my reflexes are worlds above what they were a year ago. There are loads of games you can play with this set up- moving through the grid to attack one specific target, "bouncing" from side to side without stopping and parrying/dodging, same with only striking and dodging, trying to hit each target with a fast combo as cleanly as possible then moving to the outside, etc...

To add differentiation to the training mix, I like to work on using the tennis balls as targets for finger strikes, one knuckle strikes and grip work. Getting all four bottles moving and parrying/dodging them and throwing heavy strikes while still having the acuity and coordination to home in on a tennis bakll is great overall training- fine motor coordination and visual acuity is one of the first things that diminshes with an adrenaline dump. If you don't have the space for this sort of thing, hang targets from door frames or an outdoor deck/porch. Or hang a few tennis balls around your heavy bag and work on parrying/dodging as you nail the bag.

A less involved way that boxers train the slip is to:
-cut a slit in a tennis ball
-thread an elastic cord around a washer and then push that into the tennis ball
-tie a loop in the other end big enough to fit around your head (make sure you have 3 feet or so of length in between this and the ball)
-once it's around your forehead, practice light and quick taps on the ball with one hand. The ball will go zigzagging all over creation and often right back at your face. As you move to avoid it, the cord yanks the ball with you from a different trajectory. Get good at avoiding it and still hitting it, then try two hands...this can be incredibly frustrating! But it pays off quickly, and with great results for your reflexes. I refer to this as "Harry Balls", in reference to Harry Cook who showed it to me.

Have at it, enjoy.

REMsimpson
Dec 07, 2008, 06:23 PM
Finally got a clip up of it being used:

REMsimpson
Dec 07, 2008, 06:29 PM
http://tkriblog.wordpress.com/2008/12/01/rainy-day-training-1/

phlex
Dec 07, 2008, 07:43 PM
very interesting, it seems to me ( I haven't tested it yet) that it train reflexes, but also striking speed as well as accuracy, balance and deplacement. this is very usefull in brawl where blows come from everywhere and you have to face your foe(s) or not to have them at in your back at 4 o'clok till 8 o'clock at least to avoid sucker punches.

REMsimpson
Dec 07, 2008, 08:51 PM
Yep, and the best part is that it is make-able with more or less free materials (except for duct tape) and it provides instantaneous feedback with all the other stuff you point out.

frankenskid
Dec 15, 2008, 02:53 PM
That sounds like a great way to train, both the elastic and the frame.

t0aster
Dec 27, 2008, 12:00 AM
There was a loose string in a weight room, and I used to bat it, and then try to dodge it. Since the string barely had any mass, the breeze from my motions would blow it in a new angle. When it slowed down I batted it away again. I don't know if it improved my reflexes, but I sure looked foolish.

USMC machine
Dec 27, 2008, 07:38 PM
There was a loose string in a weight room, and I used to bat it, and then try to dodge it. Since the string barely had any mass, the breeze from my motions would blow it in a new angle. When it slowed down I batted it away again. I don't know if it improved my reflexes, but I sure looked foolish.

Mike Tyson used something of this sort to improve his head movement.

Journeyman
Dec 27, 2008, 09:33 PM
Mike Tyson used something of this sort to improve his head movement.

With a weight on it though. Still, a string wouldn't be bad.

onelasttime
Dec 29, 2008, 10:39 PM
Before trying to wire in a bob,weave,block first you have to have done those moves enough for them to hard wired o ryou will not improve much. So the more intuitive and simple the move the easier it is to improve on it the more complex themovement the harder it is.

Visualization is one of the bigest secrets to gaining speed.

stevenl
Jan 08, 2009, 01:37 PM
My friends and I always did(and sometimes still do) medium speed bare knuckle sparring, in which one person is the attacker, and the other must simply block and dodge strikes, and is not allowed to strike the other. The medium speed does not matter, when it comes time to use it, the repetition will be there and you'll be ready!

*Note: We did not train martial arts as a sport, only for street use.

REMsimpson
Jan 08, 2009, 02:08 PM
That's a favorite at our dojo as well. After a few rounds of doing what you describe, the 'attacker' puts on a chest protector, and can now kick low and tackle/grab as well as punch; the defender is limited to specific, but full power responses:

A) Block/Parry/Evade
B) B/P/E and punch to midsection
C) B/P/E and punch/strike to anywhere (obviously not full power to the face/head)
D) B/P/E and kick to the legs
E) B/P/E and clinch/strike
F) B/P/E and throw/control the attacker
G) Defender does whatever the hell they can get, any response

\Eventually the momentum works people into going more or less full speed, and full power to the chest protector, but control is maintained and no one gets hurt.

We're also a non-sport school, and after seeing us do some of the above types of things, the local "freestyle karate" folks have put out the word that we're "too violent." Kind of makes me proud - at least I know it works outside of the dojo :twisted:

Dominator350
Jan 08, 2009, 07:59 PM
bungee ball and speedbag. Im a run down stoner and this shit every day has turned me lightning fast and reactive to everything around me.

CDavidNeely
Jan 14, 2009, 06:41 AM
Greetings,

The majority of responses have been directed towards speed of technique and reflex. You might want to spend some time working on perception. Teaching your body to react to a hazardous condition is only part of the issue. You have to know its hazardous first. Work on your peripheral vision, eye movement and hearing. Practice body perception using something like sticky hands (as a simple exercise without the "chi" stuff that tends to get confused with the physical practice).

In the words of a teacher you need to, "practice proactive perception." Most of us spend our days in a fugue of sensory deprivation. This is especially dangerous during combat because we start narrowing our attention. Its a part of our natural reaction system and it takes conscious effort to overcome it.

Just a few thoughts for the morning.

David

OneTruth13
Jan 14, 2009, 10:30 AM
bungee ball and speedbag. Im a run down stoner and this shit every day has turned me lightning fast and reactive to everything around me.

Well the run down stoner is probabaly part of the reason your so fast, little nervous, little anxious, you can think slower while moving faster (makes a huge difference in a fight). Being calm in the head while fast in the hands is something to be desired especially if your a boxer.

Dom by the way, how old are you?

mmraz
Jan 18, 2009, 12:25 AM
What about durians, that would be fun too...

really though, one thing you could do (this sounds silly too) is to 'fight' your tv. When the scene changes, throw a punch, kick, whatever. But only then. And you don't know when the scene will change either...kind of fun. I never got the hang of it.

I've done this, too. I don't watch much tv either but you don't actually have to be watching, call it moving meditation and your friends will be much more impressed. Try doing it intentionally off balance. It doesn't feel like it's doing much but you'd be surprised!